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Dr. Mirna Carranza

New Report: Examining the Intersection of Immigrant Women's Acculturation and Mental Health

Mirna Carranza of the School of Social Work, recently released a report that analyzed the lived experiences of immigrant families, with a particular focus on women, their roles within their families, and the relationship between their acculturation and mental health.

Jan 12, 2018

Dr. Mirna Carranza, Associate Professor in the School of Social Work, McMaster University in collaboration with the Immigrants Working Centre, the Emergency Support Committee for Refugees and the Hamilton Community Legal Clinic, with funding from Hamilton Community Foundation, has been examining the complexities of women’s migration to Hamilton. The purpose of the research study was to understand how migration, integration and trauma, impact(s) women’s mental health, and to use these experiences to develop recommendations to better meet the needs of newcomers.

The report “Examining the Intersection of Immigrant Women’s Acculturation & Mental Health” details some of the lived realities of migration that were shared with the research team, led by Dr. Carranza.

For this project, a qualitative research design was utilized, including community consultations, followed by focus groups and individual in-depth interviews. In total, 78 people participated, including five adolescent/adult children, 35 professionals involved in service provision to Women Immigrants (e.g. settlement workers, counsellors, case managers, home visitors, public health nurses and community workers) and 38 Women.

This research was the basis for the popular theatre play “We are not the Others”, that was featured at the Hamilton Fringe Festival (2017) and continues to show at venues in Southwestern Ontario. The play humanizes the stories of the participants’, allowing audience members into their world, a reality of migration that many “regular” Canadians are unfamiliar with.  

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