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Dr. Randy Jackson (left), John R. Sylliboy (right)

Understanding Health Issues for Two-Spirited and Indigenous LGBTQ+ People; Resiliency and Social Determinants of Health

Dr. Randy Jackson and John R. Sylliboy will be speaking on Feb. 1, 2019 from 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.in MDCL 3023. Topics covered include: The Two-Spirit HIV/AIDS Wellness and Longevity Study The Wabanaki Two-Spirit Alliance: Addressing barriers in health through partnership building and collaboration including research.

Jan 17, 2019

McMaster University’s Indigenous Students Health Sciences Office presents:

Understanding Health Issues for Two-Spirited and Indigenous LGBTQ+ People; Resiliency and Social Determinants of Health with Dr. Randy Jackson and John R. Sylliboy

 

When: February 1, 2019, 1:30 pm to 3:00pm
Where: MDCL 3023

Everyone is Welcome.

Topics include:

The Two-Spirit HIV/AIDS Wellness and Longevity Study and The Wabanaki Two-Spirit Alliance: Addressing barriers in health through partnership building and collaboration including research

Speaker Bios:

Randy Jackson is an Assistant Professor in the School of Social Work at McMaster University with a joint-appointment in the Department of Health, Aging and Society. Originally from Kettle and Stony Point First Nation (Anishinaabe), Jackson explores lived experience among Indigenous peoples living with HIV and AIDS (IPHAs) using Indigenous knowledge, perspectives and values. His research has explored diverse topics, including for example, experiences of depression, resilience, and leadership. Randy is the recipient of a Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee Medal (2012) for his research work the area of HIV among Indigenous peoples.

John R. Sylliboy is L’nu from Eskasoni and Millbrook First Nations in Nova Scotia. John works in social and cultural development, health and education policy, and research and community development for Atlantic First Nation communities. His projects include IWK Health Centre for Aboriginal children’s pain research and national community and stakeholder engagement for research, consultation on First Nations education governance and post-secondary education needs, and areas that impact the health, well-being and educational outcomes of Mi’kmaq and Indigenous youth in Atlantic Canada. John is a co-founder of the Wabanaki Two-Spirit Alliance (W2SA) which helps to build support and awareness on Two-Spirits in Mi’kma’ki and Canada. John did his Bach. of International Relations in Costa Rica, and his MA in Education at Mount Saint Vincent University. He is currently in Ph.D. studies at McGill University.

For more information contact the Indigenous Students Health Sciences Office at 905-525-9140 Ext. 22367 or by email at ishs@mcmaster.ca