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Honours Bachelor of Social Work (B.S.W.)Degree Details

Length:
3-4 years
Required Credential:
Completion of any level 1 program
Program Type:
Course based, Practicum based
Program Options:
Full-time, Part-time

Bachelor of Social Work (Post Degree) (B.S.W.)Degree Details

Length:
2-3 years
Required Credential:
Undergraduate degree from a recognized university
Program Type:
Course based, Practicum based
Program Options:
Full-time, Part-time

Master of Social Work Critical Analysis (M.S.W.)Degree Details

Length:
1 year
Required Credential:
B.S.W. degree from an accredited* social work program
Program Type:
Thesis, Course Based
Program Options:
Full-time, Part-time

Master of Social Work Critical Leadership in Social Services and Communities (M.S.W.)Degree Details

Length:
1 year
Required Credential:
Bachelor of Social Work degree from an accredited social work program
Program Type:
Course Based, Practicum Based
Program Options:
Full-time

Doctor of Philosophy in Social Justice (Ph.D.)Degree Details

Length:
6 years
Required Credential:
N/A
Program Type:
Thesis, Course Based
Program Options:
Full-time

Graduate Diploma in Critical Leadership in Social Services and Communities (G.Dip.)Degree Details

Length:
1 year
Required Credential:
N/A
Program Type:
Course Based
Program Options:
Full-time

Interdisciplinary minor in Social Justice and Inclusive Communities (Minor)Degree Details

Length:
N/A
Required Credential:
Enrolment in an Honours program.
Program Type:
Course based
Program Options:
Full-time, Part-time

B.S.W.Honours Bachelor of Social Work

Students who have completed a level I program can apply to the Honours BSW program. The School of Social work aims to provide the milieu and learning resources for students at the undergraduate level to prepare themselves for the general practice of social work. Study is based on a search for the principles of social justice. Preparation for the general practice of social work requires the development of competence in effecting change in a variety of situations affecting individuals, families, groups, organizations or communities in the broader society based on a knowledge of social structure, human behaviour, social welfare services, and social work methods.

 Our programs offer:

  • A focus on social justice
  • Both academic and experiential education
  • Full-time or part-time studies
  • A degree that lets you practice as a Social Worker

What you will learn:

  • How to analyze personal, community, family and societal problems – including how social work and social welfare institutions affect and respond to these problems
  • Practical skills such as interviewing, counselling, community development, social action and advocacy

120 units total (Levels I to IV), of which 48 units may be Level I

30 units

From the Level I program completed prior to admission to the program. (See Admission below.)


12 units

SOCWORK 2A06 A/B - Theory, Process and Communication Skills for Social Work
SOCWORK 2B03 - Social Welfare: General Introduction
SOCWORK 2BB3 - Social Work and Social Welfare: Anti-Oppressive Perspectives
(SOCWORK 2A06 A/B, SOCWORK 2BB3 and SOCWORK 2B03 must be completed prior to enrolling in SOCWORK 3D06 A/B and SOCWORK 3DD6 A/B)


12 units

SOCWORK 3D06 A/B - General Social Work I
SOCWORK 3DD6 A/B - Field Practicum I
(SOCWORK 3D06 A/B and SOCWORK 3DD6 A/B must be completed prior to enrolling in SOCWORK 4D06 A/B S and SOCWORK 4DD6 A/B S)


12 units

SOCWORK 4D06 A/B S - General Social Work II
SOCWORK 4DD6 A/B S - Field Practicum II


12 units

SOCWORK 3E03 - Individual Practice Across the Lifespan
SOCWORK 3F03 - Social Work with Groups
SOCWORK 4O03 - Social Work with Communities
SOCWORK 4X03 - Social Work with Families


12 units

SOCWORK 4J03 - Social Change: Social Movements and Advocacy
Nine additional units selected from the Social and Political Context of Social Work courses


3 units

Social Sciences Research Methods


27 units

Electives * A maximum of 12 additional units of Social and Political Context of Social Work courses can be taken as electives.

Program Notes

1. Course Groupings: There are two groups of courses in the Social Work program:

Foundations of Social Work includes core courses which are required and are available to social work students only;

Social and Political Context of Social Work. Social Work students must take 12 units from the Social and Political Context of Social Work group of courses, including SOCWORK 4J03. Social and Political Context of Social Work courses are also available for elective credit by undergraduates in Level III or above of a non-Social Work program. All Social and Political Context of Social Work courses have limited enrolment.

Foundation of Social Work

  • SOCWORK 2A06 A/B - Theory, Process and Communication Skills for Social Work
  • SOCWORK 2B03 - Social Welfare: General Introduction
  • SOCWORK 2BB3 - Social Work and Social Welfare: Anti-Oppressive Perspectives
  • SOCWORK 3D06 A/B - General Social Work I
  • SOCWORK 3DD6 A/B - Field Practicum I
  • SOCWORK 3E03 - Individual Practice Across the Lifespan
  • SOCWORK 3F03 - Social Work with Groups
  • SOCWORK 4D06 A/B S - General Social Work II
  • SOCWORK 4DD6 A/B S - Field Practicum II
  • SOCWORK 4O03 - Social Work with Communities
  • SOCWORK 4X03 - Social Work with Families

Social and Political Context of Social Work

  • SOCWORK 3B03 - Transnational Lives in a Globalizing World
  • SOCWORK 3C03 - Social Aspects of Health and Illness
  • SOCWORK 3H03 - Justice and Social Welfare
  • SOCWORK 3O03 - Social Work and Sexualities
  • SOCWORK 3S03 - Social Work and Disability: Intersections and Exchanges
  • SOCWORK 3T03 - Poverty and Homelessness
  • SOCWORK 3Q03 - Indigenizing Social Work Practice Approaches 
  • SOCWORK 4B03 - Violence in Intimate Relationships
  • SOCWORK 4C03 - Racism and Social Marginalization in Canadian Society
  • SOCWORK 4G03 - Selected Topics
  • SOCWORK 4I03 - Social Work and Indigenous Peoples
  • SOCWORK 4J03 - Social Change: Social Movements and Advocacy
  • SOCWORK 4L03 - Social Work with an Aging Population
  • SOCWORK 4R03 - Women and Social Work
  • SOCWORK 4U03 - Immigration, Settlement and Social Work
  • SOCWORK 4W03 - Child Welfare
  • SOCWORK 4Y03 - Critical Issues in Mental Health and Addiction  

2. Progression Within Program: Students must achieve a minimum grade of C+ in each of SOCWORK 2A06 A/B, 2B03, 2BB3, 3D06 A/B, 3E03, 3F03, 4D06 A/B S, 4J03, 4O03 and 4X03, a Pass in their field placements SOCWORK 3DD6 A/B and 4DD6 A/B S, and a CA of at least 6.0. If a student fails to meet the minimum grade requirements in these required social work courses or a Pass designation in either field placement (SOCWORK 3DD6 A/B and 4DD6 A/B S), the student may not proceed in the program; however, the student may make a request in writing to the Director of the School of Social Work to be allowed to repeat the course in which the minimum grade or Pass requirement has not been met. Such requests will be reviewed by the Director of the School of Social Work in consultation with the Chair of the Undergraduate Studies Committee and/or the Chair of the Field Education Program and the course instructor. These courses and/or placements may only be repeated when approval is given by the Director of the School of Social Work following consultation as described above. Students who subsequently fail to meet the minimum grade or Pass requirement after repeating the course or placement may not continue in the program.

3. Students who have completed SOC WORK 2E03 but not 3A03 must take both SOCWORK 3E03 and 3F03 and reduce their selections from the Social and Political Context Group to 9 units (selection must still include SOCWORK 4J03). Those students who have taken SOC WORK 3A03 but not 2E03 must contact the School of Social Work for guidance on completion of program requirements.

4. Students must complete three units of Social Sciences research Methods (e.g. SOCIOL 2Z03, SOC PSY 2K03 or HLTHAGE 2A03). A statistics course may not substitute for a research methods course.

5. Graduation: To qualify for the Honours B.S.W. students must complete a total of 120 units. The B.S.W will be granted only if the student has achieved a grade of at least C+ in each of SOCWORK 2A06 A/B, 2B03, 2BB3, 3D06 A/B, 3E03, 3F03, 4D06 A/B S, 4J03, 4O03 and 4X03, a Pass in SOCWORK 3DD6 A/B and 4DD6 A/B S, and a CA of at least 6.0.

6. Students are expected to assume the cost of travelling to and from field practice agencies and for any related expenses.

7. Students in the social work program must apply for third and fourth year field placements (SOCWORK 3DD6 A/B and 4DD6 A/B S). Students are able to rank their placements in terms of preference. While efforts are made to match placements with student preferences, the final assignment of placement settings is constrained by many factors, including the availability of settings and field and faculty resources. Students may therefore be required to complete a field placement in an agency that is not among their preferred options.

Pathways within the B.S.W

Pathway #1: Preparing for Critical Practice in Child Welfare

Are you interested in a career in child welfare?

The McMaster University School of Social Work is partnering with child welfare agencies in southwestern Ontario to offer an enhanced educational experience to BSW students in the areas of child welfare and child protection.

What is Preparing for Critical Practice in Child Welfare (PCPCW)?

PCPCW emphasizes knowledge, skills and attitudes that underpin child welfare work, and nurtures student attitudes and critical thinking abilities by drawing on current research and best practice from around the world, including Indigenous approaches to child welfare. PCPCW prepares BSW students for long-term careers in any child protection system in Canada and similar child protection settings internationally. Emphasis will be placed on the policy and practice limitations and possibilities of various child welfare systems that students may work within. Attention is paid to producing graduates with the potential for future leadership within child welfare who can successfully work within the system while also having the ability to think outside them.

Who can participate in PCPCW?

PCPCW is possible for: 

  • Students who are currently in level 2 of the Honours BSW program;
  • Post-degree BSW students who begin in September 2016;
  • Part-time students may be eligible, but should speak with the Social Work Administrator to carefully plan their credits.

What does PCPCW include?

Students who participate in PCPCW will usually complete all of the following:

  • SW 4W03 (Child Welfare course);
  • 3D06 Field Placement (in a related area, but not in a child welfare agency); be sure to discuss your interest in the PCPCW with the Field Education coordinator - she will help you identify a relevant setting;
  • Advanced Theory Process & Communications: Critical Practice in Child Welfare (new 6-unit course to be taken in 4th year);
  • 4D06 Field Placement (in one of the participating child welfare agencies).

How does PCPCW affect my BSW field placements?

PCPCW students will complete their 3D06 Field Placement in a related area, but not in a child welfare agency to maintain the generalist character of the BSW. PCPCW students will have the opportunity to interview for a 4D06 Field Placement with at least one of the participating child welfare agencies. Students who successfully secure a placement will be provided with support and mentorship from Field Instructors who are linked to and familiar with PCPCW.

What opportunities does PCPCW offer BSW students?

Advanced Theory, Process and Communication Course

PCPCW students will take a new 6-unit advanced course on case work designed to integrate theory and practice with a particular focus on child welfare. Students who are interested in PCPCW and the new course will be asked to provide: a) a reference letter from their 3D instructor; b) a recommendation from the Undergraduate Chair (Professor Saara Greene); and c) a recommendation from the Field Education Coordinator (Professor Janice Chaplin). Registration in this course will be limited to 12 students.

Preparedness for Child Welfare Practice

PCPCW students will develop increased academic knowledge about child welfare practice, as well as a broader awareness of and commitment to increased quality service. PCPCW students will have the opportunity to apply critical social work skills in both simulated and real child welfare settings where practice is fast-paced, highly regulated, usually complex, often conflictual, and where attention to issues of power, anti-oppression, decolonization and other social justice issues is crucial.

Cross-sectoral Child Welfare Practice

Child welfare agencies maintain relationships and partnerships with a number of community stakeholders including police services, the education system, the legal / criminal justice system, social services, Public Health, etc. Students who participate in PCPCW and complete their 4th year 4D placement at a participating child welfare agency will have the opportunity to liaise with these stakeholders and engage in cross-sectoral, community development social work practice.

Pilot Projects / Special Programs

Child welfare agencies develop and offer unique programs and pilot projects to respond to client and community needs. Students who participate in PCPCW will have the opportunity to be exposed to and engage with these programs as part of their 4th year placement. Unique programs and pilot projects will be communicated when students are considering agencies for their 4th year placement.

What else do I need to know about PCPCW?

  • Participating in PCPCW is voluntary and does not result in any formal designation on your degree.
  • Do you have access to a vehicle? Most child welfare agencies require that students have a car while on placement and some agencies are a 30 to 60 minute drive from McMaster University.
  • Plan your units carefully, and have a back-up plan. Six units are needed for the new 6-unit advanced course on case work, and enrollment in this course is capped at 12 students.
  • You may not be able to complete a Minor if you are already in progress.
  • PCPCW students will be encouraged to use the Pebble Pad Learning Portfolio to reflect upon their learning and keep track of their progress through the BSW program.
  • PCPCW is being offered as a pilot and will be evaluated over 3 cohorts of BSW students. PCPCW students will be invited to participate in research, which is voluntary; your participation or not in the research will not affect any aspect of your participation in the BSW program, including student evaluations in BSW course work and field placements.

Still have questions?

For administrative questions contact Tammy Maikawa, Administrator for the School of Social Work at millet@mcmaster.ca.

For questions about child welfare social work or PCPCW curriculum content contact Gary Dumbrill at dumbrill@mcmaster.ca.

 

Pathway #2: Indigenous Pathways through the McMaster Bachelor of Social Work program

The McMaster School of Social Work has a broad mission to structure social work education, research and practice in pursuit of social justice and collective welfare. This includes a desire to focus on Indigenous experiences, knowledge and approaches towards disrupting colonialism. To this end, the School is identifying Indigenous Pathways through the BSW program.

Beginning in 2016 all incoming BSW students will have the opportunity to pursue an Indigenous Pathway through the BSW program. Honours BSW students can complete the Indigenous Pathway as well as a Minor in Indigenous Studies.

As part of the Pathway (and soon to be a requirement for all BSW students) students will take Introduction to Indigenous Studies (INDIG ST 1A03). This course is offered through a partnership between the School of Social Work and the Indigenous Studies program. The course focuses on the histories, societies and politics of First Nation, Metis, and Inuit peoples, the distinctive features of Indigenous worldviews and the history of relationships with European settler societies, with attention to treaties, legislation, and activism.

Indigenous Pathway (Honours BSW and post-degree BSW students*)

The Indigenous Pathway involves nine units of coursework and a focused placement:

  • INDIG ST 1A03: Introduction to Indigenous Studies*
  • 3Q03: Indigenizing Social Work Practice Approaches
  • 4I03: Social Work & Indigenous Peoples
  • A fourth-year placement in an indigenous-focused agency or setting
     

* Because post-degree BSW students have only Social Work courses to complete for their degree,  most post-degree students will have to take INDIG ST 1A03 in addition to their degree requirements to complete the Pathway, unless this or a similar course was taken in their first degree. Check with the School’s student advisor, Tammy Maikawa, for details.

Indigenous Pathway AND Minor in Indigenous Studies (Honours BSW students only)

The Indigenous Pathway plus Minor in Indigenous Studies involves twenty-seven units of coursework, and a focused placement.

  • 4I03: Social Work & Indigenous Peoples (taken as one of the courses towards the Minor)
  • 3Q03: Indigenizing Social Work practice approaches (taken in addition to the Minor)
  • A fourth-year placement in an indigenous-focused agency or setting
  • A Minor in Indigenous Studies requires 24 units total, 6 units from this list:
    • INDIG ST 1A03 - Introduction to Indigenous Studies
    • INDIG ST 1AA3 - Introduction to Contemporary Indigenous Studies
    • CAYUGA 1Z03 - Introduction to Cayuga Language and Culture
    • MOHAWK 1Z03 - Introduction to Mohawk Language and Culture
    • OJIBWE 1Z03 - Introduction to Ojibwe Language and Culture
  • And 18 units from the list here: http://academiccalendars.romcmaster.ca/preview_program.php?catoid=7&poid=4238&returnto=563
    Participating in the Indigenous Pathway does not result in any formal designation on your degree; however if you complete the Minor in Indigenous Studies, this appears on your degree.

Students will have to plan carefully to complete the Pathway. If you wish to follow an Indigenous Pathway through the program, please discuss this early in your BSW with the School’s student advisor, Tammy Maikawa.

Enrolment in this program is limited. Eligibility is dependent upon completion of any Level I program (a minimum of 30 units), including six units from SOCWORK 1A06 A/B or SOCIOL 1A06 A/B and six additional units of introductory level courses from the Course List below (or equivalent), normally with a minimum average of 6.0 on the most recent 30 units (five full credits) of university-level courses completed and evidence of personal suitability which may be evaluated by one or a combination of written statements, tests or interviews.

Course List

ANTHROP 1AA3 - Introduction to Anthropology: Sex, Food and Death
ANTHROP 1AB3 - Introduction to Anthropology: Race, Religion, and Conflict
CMST 1A03 - Introduction to Communication
ECON 1B03 - Introductory Microeconomics
ECON 1BB3 - Introductory Macroeconomics
GEOG 1HA3 - Human Geographies: Society and Culture
GEOG 1HB3 - Human Geographies: City and Economy
GLOBALZN 1A03 - Global Citizenship
HLTHAGE 1AA3 - Introduction to Health Studies
HLTHAGE 1BB3 - Aging and Society
HLTHAGE 1CC3 - Introduction to Mental Health and Illness
INDIGST 1A03 - Introduction to Indigenous Studies
INDIGST 1AA3 - Introduction to Contemporary Indigenous Studies
LABRST 1A03 - An Introduction to Labour in Canada
LABRST 1C03 - Voices of Work, Resistance and Change
PEACEST 1A03 - Introduction to Peace Studies
POLSCI 1G06 A/B
POLSCI 1AA3 - Government, Politics, and Power
POLSCI 1AB3 - Politics and Power in a Globalizing World
PSYCH 1X03 - Introduction to Psychology, Neuroscience & Behaviour
PSYCH 1XX3 - Foundations of Psychology, Neuroscience & Behaviour
PSYCH 1F03 - Survey of Psychology
RELIGST 1B06 A/B - What On Earth Is Religion?
RELIG ST 1D06
RELIGST 1J03 - Great Books in Asian Religions
RELIGST 1K03 
SOCPSY 1Z03 - An Introduction to Social Psychology
SOCSCI 1SS3 - Inquiry in the Social Sciences
SOCWORK 1A06 A/B - Introduction to Social Work
SOCIOL 1A06 A/B - An Introduction To Sociology
WOMENST 1A03 - Women, Culture, Power
WOMENST 1AA3 - Women Transforming the World

Admission Notes

  1. Students who have successfully completed the two-year College of Applied Arts and Technology Social Services Diploma with a minimum Grade Point Average of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale (75%) are considered to have completed the equivalent of SOCWORK 1A06 A/B and, therefore, are required to complete six additional units of introductory level courses from the Course List above.

  2. An applicant must complete Level I (a minimum of 30 units) by April of the year in which application is made.
  1. Aboriginal students (includes First Nations, Métis & Inuit) may select an alternate application process. Those who wish to do so should consult the School of Social Work for details.

  2. All applications for admission to the School of Social Work are considered annually and must be made directly to the School by March 1 for the Fall/Winter term.

Application Components

Admission scores are based 50% on results from the Social Work Admissions Test (SWAT) and 50% on a student’s GPA. 

  1. Social Work Admission Test (S.W.A.T.) - value 50%

    In accordance with the evaluation criteria of the Canadian Association of Schools of Social Work, our admission procedures include assessment of personal suitability as well as academic capability. The S.W.A.T. is designed in an effort to draw on applicants' personal and professional experiences and preparatory study is not expected or necessary for the essay-style responses.  For information on the S.W.A.T. please see our S.W.A.T. information page.

  2. Academic Record - value 50%

    Every candidate’s GPA is calculated on the most recent 30 units (5 full credits) of university-level work, whether taken at McMaster or elsewhere.  If the applicant is currently registered in 30 units, then those are used; if they are registered in fewer units, then we will go to the previous session and select sufficient units to total 30 (taking the best grades from that session).  If an applicant has received advanced credit based on community college work, we will use any university courses they have taken plus sufficient units from the community college advanced standing credit work to equal 30 units.

Application Procedures

McMASTER STUDENTS - Honours B.S.W. Program

  1. Admission links for September 2017 are now closed.  

    This application must be completed and submitted to the School of Social Work no later than March 1, 2017. 

  2. S.W.A.T.(Social Work Admissions Test)
    Once you have completed the Supplementary Application you will receive an email with instructions on activating your Mac ID.  Following that, more information on the S.W.A.T. will be sent mid-February. The S.W.A.T. will be written on-line through Avenue to Learn, in March 2017.  The three available S.W.A.T. dates are now confirmed for Wednesday, March 15th from 3:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.; Saturday, March 18th from 8:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.; Monday, March 20th from 9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.   You must submit the Supplementary Application Form to receive information about registering for the S.W.A.T.

  3. Transcripts
    The School of Social Work will obtain a copy of your official transcripts directly from the Office of the Registrar at McMaster. You need not initiate this process. 

NON-McMASTER STUDENTS - Honours B.S.W.

  1. School of Social Work Supplementary Application for Admission
    The on-line web-based application form is now closed for September 2017 admission.
    This application must be completed and submitted to the School of Social Work no later than March 1, 2017. 
  2. Ontario Universities’ Application Centre, Form 105D
    (on-line form available after October 1, 2016 at http://www.ouac.on.ca)
    Fee: $155 application fee + $85 assessment fee = $240.00
    OUAC form 105D must be completed by February 1, 2017 

  3. S.W.A.T. (Social Work Admissions Test)
    Once you have completed the Supplementary Application you will receive an email with instructions on activating your Mac ID.  Following that, more information on the S.W.A.T. will be sent mid-February. The S.W.A.T. will be written on-line through Avenue to Learn, in March 2017, date and time TBA. Several test times will be available.
  4. Transcripts
    Applicants must arrange for McMaster to receive official transcripts from all secondary and post-secondary institutions attended.  If you are currently attending fall term/semester, you must arrange for a transcript to be sent as soon as fall grades are available (to be received no later than March 1st.). If you are attending both fall and winter terms/semesters, you must have a transcript sent as soon as fall grades are available (to be received no later than March 1st) and another at the end of winter term/semester when winter grades are available.  All transcripts should be sent to the Office of the Registrar (Admissions), Gilmour Hall Room 108, McMaster University.  Fee information is available on the Ontario Universities Application Centre website.

Application Materials

All written materials submitted in relation to application for undergraduate study in social work become the property of the School of Social Work, McMaster University and cannot be returned to, or photocopied by, the applicant regardless of the final decision regarding admission.

Documents submitted by applicants who are ACCEPTED will be kept on file until October 15th of the year in which application is made, at which time all materials except the application form, scoring sheets and transcripts will be destroyed. Prior to this date, written materials may be reviewed for administrative accuracy by the applicant in the presence of a Faculty Member or the Administrative Coordinator of the School of Social Work.

Documents submitted by applicants who are NOT ACCEPTED will be kept on file until July 15th of the year following application, at which time they will be destroyed. Prior to this date written materials may be reviewed for administrative accuracy by the applicant in the presence of a Faculty Member or the Administrative Coordinator of the School of Social Work.

Subsequent applications by individuals not accepted into the School of Social Work or by individuals who withdraw from the application process will constitute NEW applications and will require re-submission of ALL documents. 

Application Withdrawal

Applicants who decide to discontinue their application at any point after submission are required to notify the School of Social Work in writing of their withdrawal.  Those who have applied through the Ontario Universities Application Centre (OUAC) must also contact them to amend their program choice.

Notification of Acceptance

Normally, notification of final decisions will be mailed on or about June 15th. You must call the School of Social Work to confirm your acceptance within 15 calendar days of the offer letter date or your position will be forfeited. For those applicants who have also applied through the Ontario Universities Application Centre, an official letter of acceptance from the Registrar's Office will be emailed to you and you must respond to OUAC as well.  Offers of acceptance cannot be deferred; students must complete a required social work (i.e. Foundation) course in the year of admission.

Advanced Standing

Advanced standing applications are considered only after formal acceptance has been issued. You are required to submit supporting transcripts and course outlines for those courses on which you wish advanced standing to be based. Identify those courses in the School for which advanced standing is sought. If you are including work experience as a factor in your request for advanced standing, please submit a detailed job description and an evaluation (form to be supplied by the School) completed by your immediate supervisor. Note that requests for advanced standing cannot solely be based on work experience. You will be notified in writing about the decision of the Advanced Standing Committee. 

Appeal Procedure

The recommendation concerning admission of an applicant by the School of Social Work Admission Committee is final, and is subject only to review for administrative correctness.

Aboriginal Students (Includes First Nations and Metis)

Aboriginal Students may select an alternate application process. For those who wish to do so, please consult the School of Social Work for details.

Additional Information

Are you still wondering if you are eligible to apply to the Honours B.S.W. or B.S.W. post-degree program?  Please complete our Pre-Application.

For more assistance in completing your application material or other administrative concerns, please contact:

Lorna O'Connell

Administrative Assistant

905-525-9140 ext 23795

Email: infobsw@mcmaster.ca

or

Tammy Maikawa, Administrator

905-525-9140 ext 23793

905-525-9140 ext 23793

 

Undergraduate Scholarships, Bursaries and Awards

All undergraduate students accepted for admission to McMaster University are automatically considered for a McMaster University entrance award. Additional entrance awards, in-course scholarships, bursaries and other forms of financial assistance is available to you at various stages of their undergraduate careers.

Each scholarship, bursary, Government Aid or Work Study Program a has its own unique application process and requirements. More information on financial aid visit the Student Financial Aid & Scholarship (SFAS) Office.

Social Work Undergraduate Awards and Scholarships

The Citizen Action Group Prize*

Established in 1984 by the Citizen Action Group, Hamilton, to honour Professor Harry L. Penny, founding Director of the School of Social Work and Board Member of Citizen Action Group.  To be awarded to the student in a program in Social Work who achieves the highest grade in SOC WORK 4O03.
Value:  $500.00

The Dr. Jean Jones Memorial Scholarship*

Established in 2005 by family and friends in memory of Dr. Jean Jones.  To be awarded to the full-time student who attains the highest cumulative average in either the Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Social Work or the Bachelor of Social Work post degree program.
Value:   $800

The Ontario Association of Social Workers Prize

Established in 1986 and augmented in 1992 by the Hamilton Branch.  Two prizes to be awarded to the graduating students, one first degree and one second degree, who successfully completes Social Work 4DD6 and attains the highest grade in Social Work 4D06 in the same session.
Value:   $200 each

The Harry L. Penny Prize

Established in 1984 in recognition of Professor Harry L. Penny, founding Director of the School of Social Work, for his outstanding contribution to the School.  To be awarded to the student with the highest Cumulative Average in a Social Work program.
Value:   $100

The Social Work Prize

Established in 1982.   To be awarded to the student who attains the highest grade in Social Work 2A06.
Value:  $100

The Anne Stein Memorial Prize

Established in 1971 by friends and colleagues of Anne Stein.   To be awarded to the student who successfully completes Social   Work 3DD6 and attains the highest grade in Social Work 3D06 in the same session.
Value:  $125 (one full-time, one part-time)

*An award name ending with an * indicates that the award is open to both full-time and part-time second baccalaureate (post degree) students.

Students must meet eligibility requirements for these awards as set out in the “General Conditions” and “Terms of Awards” described in the McMaster University Undergraduate Calendar.   For further information or clarification, please consult the Office of Student Financial Aid and Scholarships, Gilmour Hall Room 120 or 905-525-9140, Ext. 24319.

Social Work Bursaries

The Sidney L. Blum Bursary

Established in 1989 by friends and associates in memory of Sidney L. Blum.  To be granted on the recommendation of the Director of the School of Social Work, to any undergraduate student in good standing in Levels III or IV of the BA/BSW program or Level II of the BSW program.

The Kelly Dawn Lapp Memorial Bursary

Established in 1997 by family and friends under the McMaster Student Opportunity Fund initiative in memory of Kelly Dawn Lapp who received her BA/BSW degree from McMaster University in 1996.  To be granted to a student enrolled in the Social Work program who demonstrates financial need.  Preference will be given to a student who has volunteered or worked in programs related to violence against women and children, employment and affordable housing for women, advocacy and treatment of mental health patients, addiction treatment or prevention of cruelty to animals.

The Ewan Macintyre Bursaries

Established in 1999 by the Social Work Alumni Branch, the Citizen Action Group, the Social Work Students Association, faculty (past and present), staff, friends, alumni and various organizations association with McMaster’s School of Social Work as a tribute to Dr. Ewan Macintyre for his 29 years of service to the School, including 12 years of service as the School’s Director.  A variable number of bursaries to be granted to students who demonstrate financial need and are enrolled in a Bachelor of Social work program.

The Marion Pearce Bursaries

Established in 1990 by Dr. Sally Palmer in memory of her aunt Marion Pearce (class of ’20).  Miss Pearce worked with New Canadians at the Beverly Street Baptist Church in Toronto.  A variable number of bursaries to be granted to students enrolled in the Social Work program who have demonstrated financial need.

School Of Social Work Endowment Fund

Established through the generous donations of alumni, family, friends and corporate sponsors, the School of Social Work Endowment Fund will provide support in such areas as faculty research projects, student support, new initiatives and special projects.  To apply for assistance from this fund, please contact Tammy Maikawa, Administrative Co-ordinator of the School of Social Work at millet@mcmaster.ca.

Other Awards and Bursaries

For information regarding other academic awards and bursaries not specifically for social work students, please consult the Awards Section of the Undergraduate Calendar or the Office of Student Financial Aid and Scholarships, Gilmour Hall Room 120 or 905-525-9140, Ext. 24319.

Tammy Maikawa, Administrator and Academic Advisor
KTH-317

millet@mcmaster.ca

905-525-9140 ext.23793

Academic Advising

The Academic Advising office is run through the Office of the Associate Dean. The primary goal of the Advising Office is to provide all Social Sciences undergraduate students with the information and guidance they need to succeed in their academic careers.

Advisors can help you make the right academic decisions by explaining policies and regulations as well as presenting different options and supports available in your studies.

An academic advisor can assist you with:

  • Course requirements, dropping and adding courses
  • Program selection, application and changes
  • Studying abroad
  • Transfer credits
  • Petitions for missed term work, deferred examinations and special consideration
  • Appeals procedures
  • Referral to other campus services

Learn more about Academic Advising in the Social Sciences.

2016/2017 Undergraduate Calendar Understanding Level 1 Field Education McMaster / Mohawk Affiliated Certificates Soc Sci Courses
For more information:
School of Social Work
KTH 319
905-525-9140 ext. 23795
socwork@mcmaster.ca
Length:
3-4 years
Required Credential:
Completion of any level 1 program
Program Type:
Course based, Practicum based
Program Options:
Full-time, Part-time
Typical Entry:
September
Current Deadline:
March 1

B.S.W.Bachelor of Social Work (Post Degree)

Students who have completed an undergraduate degree from a recognized university can apply to our B.S.W. post degree program. The School of Social work aims to provide the milieu and learning resources for students at the undergraduate level to prepare themselves for the general practice of social work. Study is based on a search for the principles of social justice. Preparation for the general practice of social work requires the development of competence in effecting change in a variety of situations affecting individuals, families, groups, organizations or communities in the broader society based on a knowledge of social structure, human behaviour, social welfare services, and social work methods.

Our Philosophy

As social workers, we operate in a society characterized by power imbalances that affect us all. These power imbalances are based on age, class, ethnicity, gender identity, geographic location, health, ability, race, sexual identity and income. We see personal troubles as inextricably linked to oppressive structures.

We believe that social workers must be actively involved in the understanding and transformation of injustices in social institutions and in the struggles of people to maximize control over their own lives.

Our programs offer:

  • A focus on social justice
  • Both academic and experiential education
  • Full-time or part-time studies
  • A degree that lets you practice as a Social Worker


What you will learn:

  • How to analyze personal, community, family and societal problems – including how social work and social welfare institutions affect and respond to these problems
  • Practical skills such as interviewing, counselling, community development, social action and advocacy

60 units total

12 units

SOCWORK 2A06 A/B - Theory, Process and Communication Skills for Social Work
SOCWORK 2B03 - Social Welfare: General Introduction
SOCWORK 2BB3 - Social Work and Social Welfare: Anti-Oppressive Perspectives

(SOCWORK 2A06 A/B, SOCWORK 2BB3 and SOCWORK 2B03 must be completed prior to enrolling in SOCWORK 3D06 A/B and SOCWORK 3DD6 A/B)

12 units

SOCWORK 3D06 A/B - General Social Work I
SOCWORK 3DD6 A/B - Field Practicum I

(SOCWORK 3D06 A/B and SOCWORK 3DD6 A/B must be completed prior to enrolling in SOCWORK 4D06 A/B S and SOCWORK 4DD6 A/B S)

12 units

SOCWORK 4D06 A/B S - General Social Work II
SOCWORK 4DD6 A/B S - Field Practicum II

12 units

SOCWORK 3E03 - Individual Practice Across the Lifespan
SOCWORK 3F03 - Social Work with Groups
SOCWORK 4O03 - Social Work with Communities
SOCWORK 4X03 - Social Work with Families
(See Program Note 3 below)

9 units

SOCWORK 4J03 - Social Change: Social Movements and Advocacy
Six additional units selected from the Social and Political Context of Social Work courses

3 units

Social Sciences Research Methods. If requirement was completed prior to admission, these units must be chosen from Social and Political Context of Social Work courses. (See Program  Note 4 below)

Program Notes

1. Course Groupings:

There are two groups of courses in the Social Work program:

Foundations of Social Work includes core courses which are required and are available to social work students only;

Social and Political Context of Social Work. Social Work students must take 12 units from the Social and Political Context of Social Work group of courses, including SOCWORK 4J03. Social and Political Context of Social Work courses are also available for elective credit by undergraduates in Level III or above of a non-Social Work program. All Social and Political Context of Social Work courses have limited enrolment.

Foundation of Social Work

SOCWORK 2A06 A/B - Theory, Process and Communication Skills for Social Work
SOCWORK 2B03 - Social Welfare: General Introduction
SOCWORK 2BB3 - Social Work and Social Welfare: Anti-Oppressive Perspectives

SOCWORK 3D06 A/B - General Social Work I
SOCWORK 3DD6 A/B - Field Practicum I

SOCWORK 3E03 - Individual Practice Across the Lifespan
SOCWORK 3F03 - Social Work with Groups

SOCWORK 4D06 A/B S - General Social Work II
SOCWORK 4DD6 A/B S - Field Practicum II

SOCWORK 4O03 - Social Work with Communities
SOCWORK 4X03 - Social Work with Families

Social and Political Context of Social Work

SOCWORK 3B03 - Transnational Lives in a Globalizing World
SOCWORK 3C03 - Social Aspects of Health and Illness
SOCWORK 3H03 - Justice and Social Welfare
SOCWORK 3O03 - Social Work and Sexualities
SOCWORK 3S03 - Social Work and Disability: Intersections and Exchanges
SOCWORK 3T03 - Poverty and Homelessness
SOCWORK 3Q03 - Indigenizing Social Work Practice Approaches
SOCWORK 4B03 - Violence in Intimate Relationships
SOCWORK 4C03 - Racism and Social Marginalization in Canadian Society
SOCWORK 4G03 - Selected Topics
SOCWORK 4I03 - Social Work and Indigenous Peoples
SOCWORK 4J03 - Social Change: Social Movements and Advocacy
SOCWORK 4L03 - Social Work with an Aging Population
SOCWORK 4R03 - Women and Social Work
SOCWORK 4U03 - Immigration, Settlement and Social Work
SOCWORK 4W03 - Child Welfare
SOCWORK 4Y03 - Critical Issues in Mental Health and Addiction

 2. Progression Within Program:

Students must achieve a minimum grade of C+ in each of SOCWORK 2A06 A/B, 2B03, 2BB3, 3D06 A/B, 3E03, 3F03, 4D06 A/B S, 4J03, 4O03 and 4X03, a Pass in their field placements SOCWORK 3DD6 A/B and 4DD6 A/B S, and a CA of at least 6.0. If a student fails to meet the minimum grade requirements in these required social work courses or a Pass designation in either field placement (SOCWORK 3DD6 A/B and 4DD6 A/B S), the student may not proceed in the program; however, the student may make a request in writing to the Director of the School of Social Work to be allowed to repeat the course in which the minimum grade or Pass requirement has not been met. Such requests will be reviewed by the Director of the School of Social Work in consultation with the Chair of the Undergraduate Studies Committee and/or the Chair of the Field Education Program and the course instructor. These courses and/or placements may only be repeated when approval is given by the Director of the School of Social Work following consultation as described above. Students who subsequently fail to meet the minimum grade or Pass requirement after repeating the course or placement may not continue in the program.

3. Students who have completed SOC WORK 2E03 but not 3A03 must take both SOCWORK 3E03 and 3F03

and reduce their selections from the Social and Political Context Group to 9 units (selection must still include SOCWORK 4J03). Those students who have taken SOC WORK 3A03 but not 2E03 must contact the School of Social Work for guidance on completion of program requirements.

4. Students must complete three units of Social Sciences research Methods (e.g. SOCIOL 2Z03 or HLTHAGE 2A03).

If this requirement was completed prior to admission to the B.S.W. program, three additional units from the Social and Political Context of Social Work courses will be taken. A statistics course may not substitute for a research methods course.

5. Graduation:

To qualify for the B.S.W. students must complete a total of 60 units. The B.S.W will be granted only if the student has achieved a grade of at least C+ in each of SOCWORK 2A06 A/B, 2B03, 2BB3, 3D06 A/B, 3E03, 3F03, 4D06 A/B S, 4J03, 4O03 and 4X03, a Pass in SOCWORK 3DD6 A/B and 4DD6 A/B S, and a CA of at least 6.0.

6. Students are expected to assume the cost of travelling to and from field practice agencies and for any related expenses.

7. Students in the social work program must apply for third and fourth year field placements (SOCWORK 3DD6 A/B and 4DD6 A/B S),

and are able to rank their placements in terms of preference. While efforts are made to match placements with student preferences, the final assignment of placement settings is constrained by many factors, including the availability of settings and field and faculty resources. Students may therefore be required to complete a field placement in an agency that is not among their preferred options.

Pathways within the B.S.W

Pathway #1: Preparing for Critical Practice in Child Welfare

Are you interested in a career in child welfare?

The McMaster University School of Social Work is partnering with child welfare agencies in southwestern Ontario to offer an enhanced educational experience to BSW students in the areas of child welfare and child protection.

What is Preparing for Critical Practice in Child Welfare (PCPCW)?

PCPCW emphasizes knowledge, skills and attitudes that underpin child welfare work, and nurtures student attitudes and critical thinking abilities by drawing on current research and best practice from around the world, including Indigenous approaches to child welfare. PCPCW prepares BSW students for long-term careers in any child protection system in Canada and similar child protection settings internationally. Emphasis will be placed on the policy and practice limitations and possibilities of various child welfare systems that students may work within. Attention is paid to producing graduates with the potential for future leadership within child welfare who can successfully work within the system while also having the ability to think outside them.

Who can participate in PCPCW?

PCPCW is possible for: 

  • Students who are currently in level 2 of the Honours BSW program;
  • Post-degree BSW students who begin in September 2016;
  • Part-time students may be eligible, but should speak with the Social Work Administrator to carefully plan their credits.

What does PCPCW include?

Students who participate in PCPCW will usually complete all of the following:

  • SW 4W03 (Child Welfare course);
  • 3D06 Field Placement (in a related area, but not in a child welfare agency); be sure to discuss your interest in the PCPCW with the Field Education coordinator - she will help you identify a relevant setting;
  • Advanced Theory Process & Communications: Critical Practice in Child Welfare (new 6-unit course to be taken in 4th year);
  • 4D06 Field Placement (in one of the participating child welfare agencies).

How does PCPCW affect my BSW field placements?

PCPCW students will complete their 3D06 Field Placement in a related area, but not in a child welfare agency to maintain the generalist character of the BSW. PCPCW students will have the opportunity to interview for a 4D06 Field Placement with at least one of the participating child welfare agencies. Students who successfully secure a placement will be provided with support and mentorship from Field Instructors who are linked to and familiar with PCPCW.

What opportunities does PCPCW offer BSW students?

Advanced Theory, Process and Communication Course

PCPCW students will take a new 6-unit advanced course on case work designed to integrate theory and practice with a particular focus on child welfare. Students who are interested in PCPCW and the new course will be asked to provide: a) a reference letter from their 3D instructor; b) a recommendation from the Undergraduate Chair (Professor Saara Greene); and c) a recommendation from the Field Education Coordinator (Professor Janice Chaplin). Registration in this course will be limited to 12 students.

Preparedness for Child Welfare Practice

PCPCW students will develop increased academic knowledge about child welfare practice, as well as a broader awareness of and commitment to increased quality service. PCPCW students will have the opportunity to apply critical social work skills in both simulated and real child welfare settings where practice is fast-paced, highly regulated, usually complex, often conflictual, and where attention to issues of power, anti-oppression, decolonization and other social justice issues is crucial.

Cross-sectoral Child Welfare Practice

Child welfare agencies maintain relationships and partnerships with a number of community stakeholders including police services, the education system, the legal / criminal justice system, social services, Public Health, etc. Students who participate in PCPCW and complete their 4th year 4D placement at a participating child welfare agency will have the opportunity to liaise with these stakeholders and engage in cross-sectoral, community development social work practice.

Pilot Projects / Special Programs

Child welfare agencies develop and offer unique programs and pilot projects to respond to client and community needs. Students who participate in PCPCW will have the opportunity to be exposed to and engage with these programs as part of their 4th year placement. Unique programs and pilot projects will be communicated when students are considering agencies for their 4th year placement.

What else do I need to know about PCPCW?

  • Participating in PCPCW is voluntary and does not result in any formal designation on your degree.
  • Do you have access to a vehicle? Most child welfare agencies require that students have a car while on placement and some agencies are a 30 to 60 minute drive from McMaster University.
  • Plan your units carefully, and have a back-up plan. Six units are needed for the new 6-unit advanced course on case work, and enrollment in this course is capped at 12 students.
  • You may not be able to complete a Minor if you are already in progress.
  • PCPCW students will be encouraged to use the Pebble Pad Learning Portfolio to reflect upon their learning and keep track of their progress through the BSW program.
  • PCPCW is being offered as a pilot and will be evaluated over 3 cohorts of BSW students. PCPCW students will be invited to participate in research, which is voluntary; your participation or not in the research will not affect any aspect of your participation in the BSW program, including student evaluations in BSW course work and field placements.

Still have questions?

For administrative questions contact Tammy Maikawa, Administrator for the School of Social Work at millet@mcmaster.ca.

For questions about child welfare social work or PCPCW curriculum content contact Gary Dumbrill at dumbrill@mcmaster.ca.

 

Pathway #2: Indigenous Pathways through the McMaster Bachelor of Social Work program

The McMaster School of Social Work has a broad mission to structure social work education, research and practice in pursuit of social justice and collective welfare. This includes a desire to focus on Indigenous experiences, knowledge and approaches towards disrupting colonialism. To this end, the School is identifying Indigenous Pathways through the BSW program.

Beginning in 2016 all incoming BSW students will have the opportunity to pursue an Indigenous Pathway through the BSW program. Honours BSW students can complete the Indigenous Pathway as well as a Minor in Indigenous Studies.

As part of the Pathway (and soon to be a requirement for all BSW students) students will take Introduction to Indigenous Studies (INDIG ST 1A03). This course is offered through a partnership between the School of Social Work and the Indigenous Studies program. The course focuses on the histories, societies and politics of First Nation, Metis, and Inuit peoples, the distinctive features of Indigenous worldviews and the history of relationships with European settler societies, with attention to treaties, legislation, and activism.

Indigenous Pathway (Honours BSW and post-degree BSW students*)

The Indigenous Pathway involves nine units of coursework and a focused placement:

  • INDIG ST 1A03: Introduction to Indigenous Studies*
  • 3Q03: Indigenizing Social Work Practice Approaches
  • 4I03: Social Work & Indigenous Peoples
  • A fourth-year placement in an indigenous-focused agency or setting
     

* Because post-degree BSW students have only Social Work courses to complete for their degree,  most post-degree students will have to take INDIG ST 1A03 in addition to their degree requirements to complete the Pathway, unless this or a similar course was taken in their first degree. Check with the School’s student advisor, Tammy Maikawa, for details.

Indigenous Pathway AND Minor in Indigenous Studies (Honours BSW students only)

The Indigenous Pathway plus Minor in Indigenous Studies involves twenty-seven units of coursework, and a focused placement.

  • 4I03: Social Work & Indigenous Peoples (taken as one of the courses towards the Minor)
  • 3Q03: Indigenizing Social Work practice approaches (taken in addition to the Minor)
  • A fourth-year placement in an indigenous-focused agency or setting
  • A Minor in Indigenous Studies requires 24 units total, 6 units from this list:
    • INDIG ST 1A03 - Introduction to Indigenous Studies
    • INDIG ST 1AA3 - Introduction to Contemporary Indigenous Studies
    • CAYUGA 1Z03 - Introduction to Cayuga Language and Culture
    • MOHAWK 1Z03 - Introduction to Mohawk Language and Culture
    • OJIBWE 1Z03 - Introduction to Ojibwe Language and Culture
  • And 18 units from the list here: http://academiccalendars.romcmaster.ca/preview_program.php?catoid=7&poid=4238&returnto=563
    Participating in the Indigenous Pathway does not result in any formal designation on your degree; however if you complete the Minor in Indigenous Studies, this appears on your degree.

Students will have to plan carefully to complete the Pathway. If you wish to follow an Indigenous Pathway through the program, please discuss this early in your BSW with the School’s student advisor, Tammy Maikawa.

Individuals interested in the B.S.W (Post Degree) program must apply directly to the School of Social Work.

Enrolment in this program is limited. Eligibility is dependent upon completion of an undergraduate degree from a recognized university, including six units from SOCIOL 1A06 A/B or SOCWORK 1A06 A/B and six additional units of introductory level courses from the Course List (See below), normally with a minimum average of 6.0 on the most recent 30 units (five full credits) of university-level courses completed and evidence of personal suitability which may be evaluated by one or a combination of written statements, tests or interviews.

Course List

ANTHROP 1AA3 - Introduction to Anthropology: Sex, Food and Death
ANTHROP 1AB3 - Introduction to Anthropology: Race, Religion, and Conflict
CMST 1A03 - Introduction to Communication
ECON 1B03 - Introductory Microeconomics
ECON 1BB3 - Introductory Macroeconomics
GEOG 1HA3 - Human Geographies: Society and Culture
GEOG 1HB3 - Human Geographies: City and Economy
GLOBALZN 1A03 - Global Citizenship
HLTHAGE 1AA3 - Introduction to Health Studies
HLTHAGE 1BB3 - Aging and Society
HLTHAGE 1CC3 - Introduction to Mental Health and Illness
INDIGST 1A03 - Introduction to Indigenous Studies
INDIGST 1AA3 - Introduction to Contemporary Indigenous Studies
LABRST 1A03 - An Introduction to Labour in Canada
LABRST 1C03 - Voices of Work, Resistance and Change
PEACEST 1A03 - Introduction to Peace Studies
POLSCI 1G06 A/B
POLSCI 1AA3 - Government, Politics, and Power
POLSCI 1AB3 - Politics and Power in a Globalizing World
PSYCH 1X03 - Introduction to Psychology, Neuroscience & Behaviour
PSYCH 1XX3 - Foundations of Psychology, Neuroscience & Behaviour
PSYCH 1F03 - Survey of Psychology
RELIGST 1B06 A/B - What On Earth Is Religion?
RELIG ST 1D06
RELIGST 1J03 - Great Books in Asian Religions
RELIGST 1K03
SOCPSY 1Z03 - An Introduction to Social Psychology
SOCSCI 1SS3 - Inquiry in the Social Sciences
SOCWORK 1A06 A/B - Introduction to Social Work
SOCIOL 1A06 A/B - An Introduction To Sociology
WOMENST 1A03 - Women, Culture, Power
WOMENST 1AA3 - Women Transforming the World

Admission Notes

  1. Students who have successfully completed the two-year College of Applied Arts and Technology Social Services Diploma with a minimum Grade Point Average of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale (75%) are considered to have completed the equivalent of SOCWORK 1A06 A/B and, therefore, are required to complete six additional units from the Course List above
  2. An applicant is required to complete the prerequisite undergraduate degree work by April of the year in which application is made.
  3. Aboriginal students (includes First Nations, Métis & Inuit) may select an alternate application process. Those who wish to do so should consult the School of Social Work for details.
  4. All applications for admission to the School of Social Work are considered annually and must be made directly to the School well before March 1 for the Fall/Winter term.

Application Components

Admission scores are based 50% on results from the Social Work Admissions Test (SWAT) and 50% on a student’s GPA. 

  1. Social Work Admission Test (S.W.A.T.) - value 50%

    In accordance with the evaluation criteria of the Canadian Association of Schools of Social Work, our admission procedures include assessment of personal suitability as well as academic capability. The S.W.A.T. is designed in an effort to draw on applicants' personal and professional experiences and preparatory study is not expected or necessary for the essay-style responses.  For information on the S.W.A.T. please see our S.W.A.T. information page.

  2. Academic Record - value 50%

    Every candidate’s GPA is calculated on the most recent 30 units (5 full credits) of university-level work, whether taken at McMaster or elsewhere.  If the applicant is currently registered in 30 units, then those are used; if they are registered in fewer units, then we will go to the previous session and select sufficient units to total 30 (taking the best grades from that session).  If an applicant has received advanced credit based on community college work, we will use any university courses they have taken plus sufficient units from the community college advanced standing credit work to equal 30 units.

Application Procedures

Two-Tier Applications

Individuals interested in the B.S.W. program must complete two application forms as follows:

  1. General Application (February 1)
    *Application is now closed.

    If you have graduated from a University other than McMaster you must complete the 105D on-line application form (with payment) at http://www.ouac.on.ca/.
    NOTE: This on-line application is now closed.
    If you are a McMaster graduate, complete (with payment) the McMaster Returning Student Application at http://future.mcmaster.ca/admission/process/returning/
    NOTE: This on-line application is now closed.
  2. Supplementary Application (March 1)

    The on-line web-based application form is now closed for September 2017 admission.

    This application must be completed and submitted to the School of Social Work no later than March 1, 2017. 
  3. S.W.A.T. (Social Work Admissions Test)

    Once you have completed the Supplementary Application you will receive an email with instructions on activating your Mac ID.  Following that, more information on the S.W.A.T. will be sent mid-February. The S.W.A.T. will be written on-line through Avenue to Learn, in March 2017. The three available S.W.A.T. dates are now confirmed for Wednesday, March 15th from 3:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.; Saturday, March 18th from 8:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.; Monday, March 20th from 9:00 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.   You must submit the Supplementary Application Form to receive information about registering for the S.W.A.T.
  4. Transcripts

    McMaster Students
    The School of Social Work will obtain a copy of your official transcripts directly from the Office of the Registrar at McMaster. You need not initiate this process.
    Non-McMaster Students

    Applicants must arrange for McMaster to receive official transcripts from any post secondary institutions attended. If you are not currently attending university, you must request a transcript which indicates your degree has been conferred (to be received no later than March 1st). If you are currently attending fall term/semester, you must arrange for a transcript to be sent as soon as fall grades are available (to be received no later than March 1st.). If you are attending both fall and winter terms/semesters, you must have a transcript sent as soon as fall grades are available (to be received no later than March 1st) and another at the end of winter term/semester when winter grades are available. All transcripts should be sent to the Office of the Registrar (Admissions), Gilmour Hall Room 108, McMaster University. Fee information is available on the Ontario Universities Application Centre website. 

Application Materials

All written materials submitted in relation to application for undergraduate study in social work become the property of the School of Social Work, McMaster University and cannot be returned to, or photocopied by, the applicant regardless of the final decision regarding admission.

Documents submitted by applicants who are ACCEPTED will be kept on file until October 15th of the year in which application is made, at which time all materials except the application form, scoring sheets and transcripts will be destroyed. Prior to this date, written materials may be reviewed for administrative accuracy by the applicant in the presence of a Faculty Member or the Administrative Coordinator of the School of Social Work.

Documents submitted by applicants who are NOT ACCEPTED will be kept on file until July 15th of the year following application, at which time they will be destroyed. Prior to this date written materials may be reviewed for administrative accuracy by the applicant in the presence of a Faculty Member or the Administrative Coordinator of the School of Social Work.

Subsequent applications by individuals not accepted into the School of Social Work or by individuals who withdraw from the application process will constitute NEW applications and will require re-submission of ALL documents.

Application Withdrawal

Applicants who decide to discontinue their application at any point after submission are required to notify the School of Social Work in writing of their withdrawal.  Those who have applied through the Ontario Universities Application Centre (OUAC) must also contact them to amend their program choice.

Notification of Acceptance

Normally, notification of final decisions will be mailed on or about June 15th. You must call the School of Social Work to confirm your acceptance within 15 calendar days of the offer letter date or your position will be forfeited. For those applicants who have also applied through the Ontario Universities Application Centre, an official letter of acceptance from the Registrar's Office will be emailed to you and you must respond to OUAC as well.  Offers of acceptance cannot be deferred; students must complete a required social work (i.e. Foundation) course in the year of admission. 

Advanced Standing

Advanced standing applications are considered only after formal acceptance has been issued. You are required to submit supporting transcripts and course outlines for those courses on which you wish advanced standing to be based. Identify those courses in the School for which advanced standing is sought. If you are including work experience as a factor in your request for advanced standing, please submit a detailed job description and an evaluation (form to be supplied by the School) completed by your immediate supervisor. Note that requests for advanced standing cannot solely be based on work experience. You will be notified in writing about the decision of the Advanced Standing Committee.

Appeal Procedure

The recommendation concerning admission of an applicant by the School of Social Work Admission Committee is final, and is subject only to review for administrative correctness.

Aboriginal Students (Includes First Nations and Metis)

Aboriginal Students may select an alternate application process. For those who wish to do so, please consult the School of Social Work for details. 

Additional Information

Are you still wondering if you are eligible to apply to the Honours B.S.W. or B.S.W. post-degree program?  Please complete our Pre-Application.

For more assistance in completing your application material or other administrative concerns, please contact:

Lorna O'Connell

Administrative Assistant

905-525-9140 ext 23795

Email: infobsw@mcmaster.ca

or

Tammy Maikawa, Administrator

905-525-9140 ext 23793

 

 

Undergraduate Scholarships, Bursaries and Awards

All undergraduate students accepted for admission to McMaster University are automatically considered for a McMaster University entrance award. Additional entrance awards, in-course scholarships, bursaries and other forms of financial assistance is available to you at various stages of their undergraduate careers.

Each scholarship, bursary, Government Aid or Work Study Program a has its own unique application process and requirements. More information on financial aid visit the Student Financial Aid & Scholarship (SFAS) Office.

Social Work Undergraduate Awards and Scholarships

The Citizen Action Group Prize*

Established in 1984 by the Citizen Action Group, Hamilton, to honour Professor Harry L. Penny, founding Director of the School of Social Work and Board Member of Citizen Action Group.  To be awarded to the student in a program in Social Work who achieves the highest grade in SOC WORK 4O03.
Value:  $500.00

The Dr. Jean Jones Memorial Scholarship*

Established in 2005 by family and friends in memory of Dr. Jean Jones.  To be awarded to the full-time student who attains the highest cumulative average in either the Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Social Work or the Bachelor of Social Work post degree program.
Value:   $800

The Ontario Association of Social Workers Prize

Established in 1986 and augmented in 1992 by the Hamilton Branch.  Two prizes to be awarded to the graduating students, one first degree and one second degree, who successfully completes Social Work 4DD6 and attains the highest grade in Social Work 4D06 in the same session.
Value:   $200 each

The Harry L. Penny Prize

Established in 1984 in recognition of Professor Harry L. Penny, founding Director of the School of Social Work, for his outstanding contribution to the School.  To be awarded to the student with the highest Cumulative Average in a Social Work program.
Value:   $100

The Social Work Prize

Established in 1982.   To be awarded to the student who attains the highest grade in Social Work 2A06.
Value:  $100

The Anne Stein Memorial Prize

Established in 1971 by friends and colleagues of Anne Stein.   To be awarded to the student who successfully completes Social   Work 3DD6 and attains the highest grade in Social Work 3D06 in the same session.
Value:  $125 (one full-time, one part-time)

*An award name ending with an * indicates that the award is open to both full-time and part-time second baccalaureate (post degree) students.

Students must meet eligibility requirements for these awards as set out in the “General Conditions” and “Terms of Awards” described in the McMaster University Undergraduate Calendar.   For further information or clarification, please consult the Office of Student Financial Aid and Scholarships, Gilmour Hall Room 120 or 905-525-9140, Ext. 24319.

 

Social Work Bursaries

The Sidney L. Blum Bursary

Established in 1989 by friends and associates in memory of Sidney L. Blum.  To be granted on the recommendation of the Director of the School of Social Work, to any undergraduate student in good standing in Levels III or IV of the BA/BSW program or Level II of the BSW program.

The Kelly Dawn Lapp Memorial Bursary

Established in 1997 by family and friends under the McMaster Student Opportunity Fund initiative in memory of Kelly Dawn Lapp who received her BA/BSW degree from McMaster University in 1996.  To be granted to a student enrolled in the Social Work program who demonstrates financial need.  Preference will be given to a student who has volunteered or worked in programs related to violence against women and children, employment and affordable housing for women, advocacy and treatment of mental health patients, addiction treatment or prevention of cruelty to animals.

The Ewan Macintyre Bursaries

Established in 1999 by the Social Work Alumni Branch, the Citizen Action Group, the Social Work Students Association, faculty (past and present), staff, friends, alumni and various organizations association with McMaster’s School of Social Work as a tribute to Dr. Ewan Macintyre for his 29 years of service to the School, including 12 years of service as the School’s Director.  A variable number of bursaries to be granted to students who demonstrate financial need and are enrolled in a Bachelor of Social work program.

The Marion Pearce Bursaries

Established in 1990 by Dr. Sally Palmer in memory of her aunt Marion Pearce (class of ’20).  Miss Pearce worked with New Canadians at the Beverly Street Baptist Church in Toronto.  A variable number of bursaries to be granted to students enrolled in the Social Work program who have demonstrated financial need. 

School Of Social Work Endowment Fund

Established through the generous donations of alumni, family, friends and corporate sponsors, the School of Social Work Endowment Fund will provide support in such areas as faculty research projects, student support, new initiatives and special projects.  To apply for assistance from this fund, please contact Tammy Maikawa, Administrative Co-ordinator of the School of Social Work at millet@mcmaster.ca. 

Other Awards and Bursaries

For information regarding other academic awards and bursaries not specifically for social work students, please consult the Awards Section of the Undergraduate Calendar or the Office of Student Financial Aid and Scholarships, Gilmour Hall Room 120 or 905-525-9140, Ext. 24319.

 

Tammy Maikawa 
Administrator and Academic Advisor
KTH-317
millet@mcmaster.ca
905-525-9140 ext.23793

Academic Advising

The Academic Advising office is run through the Office of the Associate Dean. The primary goal of the Advising Office is to provide all Social Sciences undergraduate students with the information and guidance they need to succeed in their academic careers.

Advisors can help you make the right academic decisions by explaining policies and regulations as well as presenting different options and supports available in your studies.

An academic advisor can assist you with:

  • Course requirements, dropping and adding courses
  • Program selection, application and changes
  • Studying abroad
  • Transfer credits
  • Petitions for missed term work, deferred examinations and special consideration
  • Appeals procedures
  • Referral to other campus services

Learn more about Academic Advising in the Social Sciences.

2016/2017 Undergraduate Calendar Understanding Level 1 Field Education McMaster / Mohawk Affiliated Certificates Soc Sci Courses
For more information:
School of Social Work
KTH 319
905-525-9140 ext. 23795
socwork@mcmaster.ca
Length:
2-3 years
Required Credential:
Undergraduate degree from a recognized university
Program Type:
Course based, Practicum based
Program Options:
Full-time, Part-time
Typical Entry:
September
Current Deadline:
March 1

M.S.W.Master of Social Work Critical Analysis

The primary objective of the MSW: Critical Analysis of Social Work is to provide opportunities for students to develop knowledge and skills necessary for the critical analysis of social work, and to examine the challenges and possibilities of working toward more inclusive and just policies and practices in the future.

Its goal is to prepare students for advanced practice in the critical analysis of social work. This stream in the MSW program fosters in students new ways of understanding social work and its structuring, and possibilities for re-orienting their thinking and practice, in pursuit of a justice agenda.


Specifically, the program supports students’ development of conceptual, theoretical and analytical skills in relation to social work practices and social policies; an appreciation of the entanglement of fact and value, of material and discursive framings of social problems and the conceptualization and implementation of responses to them; the ability to apply these skills and modes of understanding to substantive areas of interest and in their research practice; and   the capacity to move from analysis of social work/social welfare issues or problems to consideration of the possibilities and limits of action and change in practices or policies.

The MSW: Critical Analysis of Social Work curriculum has three main components:

  1. Required courses that provide the content and methodological skills necessary for policy and practice analysis;
  2. Elective courses that enable students to deepen their knowledge of practice and policy in the inner workings of social agencies and in social change efforts at the community level.
  3. Thesis designed to integrate analytical and evaluative skills and to contribute to the critical analysis of policy and practice. 

    Note: All courses are half or one-term courses (Fall or Winter), except SW739 which runs over all three terms (Fall, Winter and Spring/Summer).


Three required Courses:

  • 700 / Social Work Practice: Critical Frameworks
  • 701 / Social Policy: Critical Frameworks
  • 739 / Critical Approaches to Social Work Knowledge and Research Methods

Two Elective Courses:

  1. i) At least one of:
  • 721 / Changing Communities: Tensions and Possibilities for Citizenship and Social Justice
  • 740 / Changing Social Service Organizations: Implications for Workers and Service Users
  1. ii) One additional elective

Eligibility

To be eligible for admission to the MSW: Critical Analysis of Social Work stream, applicants are required to hold a B.S.W. degree from an accredited* social work program. In addition, admission requirements are:

  • half course in introductory social research methods;
  • B+ standing in senior level social work courses.

International degrees: The Canadian Association of Social Workers (CASW) establishes if an applicant’s education is equivalent to a Canadian Social Work degree (Bachelor or Master).Click here to download an International Assessment of Credentials application form.

Application Materials

In order for your application to be considered complete, it must include the following items:

  • Online Application Form and Fee
  • Statement of Interest (applicant uploads pdf directly)
  • Resumé (applicant uploads pdf directly)
  • Referee Reports (referees complete online report directly using e-referencing system)
  • Transcripts (applicant uploads unofficial transcript directly). Original transcripts must be sent directly from issuing institution*.
  • English proficiency requirements, if applicable (applicant uploads unofficial copy directly). Original documents sent directly from issuing institution*.

*Note: Transcripts and English Proficiency documents must be sent directly from issuing institution(s) to:

Darlene Savoy, Administrative Assistant
School of Social Work, McMaster University
1280 Main Street West, KTH-319
Hamilton ON L8S 4M4
dsavoy@mcmaster.ca  

Timelines for Application

Applications will be accepted up to December 15.

Offers of admission and financial assistance are normally sent out mid-January to end of April.

Application Form and Fee

Application forms must be completed online (Note: portal is NOW OPEN). Please search for “Critical Analysis of Social Work” application by choosing either "Full-time" or "Part-time" and "Academic Program" is "Social Sciences MSW" option. In the “Upload Documents” section, in addition to your CV & Statement of Interest, please also upload Unofficial Transcript(s) and TOEFL (if applicable).

A non-refundable $100 (CAN) application fee is applied to all applications. The fee can be paid on-line by Visa or MasterCard.  If you choose to pay by cheque or money order please send it to the School of Graduate Studies address noted below. There is a handling fee of $15 (CAN), making the total amount due $115 (CAN).

School of Graduate Studies
McMaster University
Gilmour Hall, Room 212
1280 Main Street West
Hamilton ON Canada L8S 4L8

Transcripts

Applicants must provide two official transcript of university academic work completed to date, sent directly from the issuing institution to the School of Social Work (address above).

 

Statement of Interest

A written statement not exceeding 4 typed double-spaced pages, expanding on your resumé, covering the following areas:

1)    What is the most significant issue facing the community with which you’re connected or about which you care?

2)    Work experience:  we are particularly interested in examples of relevant experience which indicate a capacity for innovative and independent thinking, and in your reflection on opportunities you may have had to participate in research projects, program planning, practice development, organized advocacy or administration.  Your description should reflect the length, range and diversity of your experience.

3)    Your career plans and expectations of this program - indicate why you are interested in this program and how you expect it to help you in pursuing your career and personal development.

4)    Brief description of any publications and unpublished papers or proposals.           

The supplementary statement is assessed based on comprehensiveness, clarity of presentation, and ability to abstract from experience.  The declaration of your area of interest and your ability to connect it to the School's areas of expertise is important.

Letters of Reference

A complete application includes two confidential letters of recommendation. Two academic references are preferred, but one work reference is acceptable if the person is able to comment on your academic skills. Referees will be asked to describe work you have been involved in that they have direct knowledge of, and comment on a) your potential - in terms of knowledge and skills - for critical analysis of social work practice and/or social welfare policies, and b) your ability to incorporate concerns for social justice into critical analyses. McMaster University uses the Electronic Referencing System. You must enter the email addresses of your referees as part of the on-line application form. The system will automatically send an e-Reference request on your behalf to the referees.

English Proficiency Requirements

If applicable, an official copy of your TOEFL score, or other evidence of competency in English is required. A minimum TOEFL score of 580 (or 237 on the computer-based TOEFL test) is needed.

Additional Information

Please complete our Pre-Application form so that we can verify your academic qualifications before you send a full application.

The School of Graduate Studies policy with regard to students with disabilities can be found in section 6.6 of the School of Graduate Studies Calendar. The full policy and further information may be obtained from the School of Graduate Studies or the Student Success Centre 905-525-9140 ext. 28652 or e-mail studentsuccess@mcmaster.ca.  For further information, consult McMaster University’s Policy for Academic Accommodation of Students with Disabilities.

Apply Now 

 

Ontario Student Assistance Program:

Application forms and brochures can be obtained from the Student Financial Aid and Scholarships office at McMaster University. Application to OSAP can be made on line at http://www.osap.gov.on.ca

Internal School of Social Work Awards:

No application required. MSW students are automatically considered for these awards.

The Judge Hugh C. Arrell Memorial Prize in Social Work

This prize was established through the generosity of friends and associates of the late Judge Hugh C. Arrell, formerly Judge of the Juvenile and Family Courts, Hamilton.  An award will be made annually at Fall Convocation on the recommendation of the Director of the School of Social Work, to the M.S.W. graduand who submitted the best Thesis to meet the requirements of the program.

The Sidney L. Blum Bursary

Established in 1989 by friends and associates in memory of Sidney L. Blum.  To be awarded by the School of Graduate Studies, on the recommendation of the Student Financial Aid and Scholarships Office, to any graduate student in good standing in the Master’s program of the School of Social Work.

The Social Work Alumni Anniversary Award

Established by the Alumni of the School of Social Work in 1993, in recognition of the 25th anniversary of the School.  The award is designed to promote social work study at the graduate level in the fields of practice and policy.  The successful recipient will be a graduate of McMaster’s B.S.W. program, have received the highest mark in the Personal Statement section of the application process, and have been admitted as a full-time student in the M.S.W. program.

External Agency Awards:
The agency guidelines and deadlines are subject to change at any time without prior notice. For complete and accurate information about external scholarship opportunities, applicants should always consult the external agency directly.

Naomi Grigg Fellowship

Soroptimist International of Toronto, a service club of business and professional women, is offering a Fellowship with a value of approx. $6,500.  This Fellowship is available to full time students enrolled in a post-graduate degree program (Masters, PhD) or in a program by which they acquire additional professional qualifications in an area related to gerontology.  Application forms are available from Margot Ryan 32 Pricklewood Crescent, Thornhill, Ontario, LeT 4T9, (905) 764-9961.   Deadline:  March 15.

Northern Bursary Program, Ministry of Community & Social Services

This provincial program offers various levels of financial assistance to post-secondary students pursuing careers in psychology, social work, speech pathology and Native ancestry, who are interested in working in designated areas of Northern Ontario.  Every student who receives a bursary must work in an area of the province designated by the Ministry of Community & Social Services, Northern Regional Office, 473 Queen St E, Ste 202, Sault Ste Marie, ON, P6A 1Z5.  Application deadline: August 31.

Major External Scholarships:

Ontario Graduate Scholarships (OGS)

Tri-Agency Canada Graduate Scholarship - Master's Programme

Applicants apply direct via Research Portal.

  • Deadline: December 1 (8:00pm)

Further information on scholarships and fellowships tenable at McMaster University, please consult the School of Graduate Studies website at:
http://graduate.mcmaster.ca/scholarships-and-funding

 

Darlene Savoy, Administrative Assistant
School of Social Work, McMaster University
1280 Main Street West, Kenneth Taylor Hall, Room 319
Hamilton ON L8S 4M4
dsavoy@mcmaster.ca  

 

For more information:
School of Social Work
KTH 319
905-525-9140 ext. 24596
dsavoy@mcmaster.ca
Length:
1 year
Required Credential:
B.S.W. degree from an accredited* social work program
Program Type:
Thesis, Course Based
Program Options:
Full-time, Part-time
Typical Entry:
September
Current Deadline:
December 15

M.S.W.Master of Social Work Critical Leadership in Social Services and Communities

The primary objective of the MSW: Critical Leadership in Social Services and Communities is to foster progressive leadership in the community and social service sectors.

The MSW: Critical Leadership in Social Services and Communities supports students’ development of:

  • conceptual, theoretical and analytical skills in relation to social work practices and social policies
  • appreciation of the changing conditions in social services and communities and the complexities and possibilities of ethical leading in the contemporary context
  • the ability to apply these skills and modes of understanding to the practice of leadership

The MSW: Critical Leadership in Social Services and Communities curriculum has two main components:

  1. Required courses that provide foundational knowledge of the critical analysis of social work practice, and the critical analysis of policy;  and required courses that provide analyses and conceptual frameworks about changing conditions in social services and communities, and about leadership 
  2. A leadership-focused practicum -- a practical experience of leadership with personalized feedback and mentorship that prepares students for leadership roles in social and community services  

Required Courses

And one of:

Practicum

Each student will have a leadership practicum (SOC WORK 751) in a social service agency or community organization. Students will take on a leadership project - for example, lead the development of a new policy, move a service initiative forward, or explore and provide recommendations about how a community need might be better met. An MSW-prepared social worker will provide field instruction. Students’ experiences, observations and actions in the field setting will become topics for reflection in the accompanying seminar (SOC WORK 750) with theory and concepts from coursework brought to bear on specific aspects of their leadership practice. The practicum will be 450 hours long (this number of hours is required for accreditation by the Canadian Association for Social Work Education).

Eligibility

To be eligible for admission to the MSW: Critical Leadership in Social Services and Communities stream, applicants are required to hold a B.S.W. degree from an accredited social work program. In addition, admission requirements are:

  • half course in introductory social research methods;
  • B+ standing in senior level social work courses;
  • experience working in social services or communities/ community services

International degrees: The Canadian Association of Social Workers (CASW) establishes if an applicant’s education is equivalent to a Canadian Social Work degree (Bachelor or Master).Click here to download an International Assessment of Credentials application form.

Application Materials

In order for your application to be considered complete, it must include the following items:

  • Online Application Form and Fee
  • Statement of Interest (applicant uploads pdf directly)
  • Resumé (applicant uploads pdf directly)
  • Referee Reports (referees complete online report directly using e-referencing system)
  • Transcripts (applicant uploads unofficial transcript directly). Original transcripts must be sent directly from issuing institution*.
  • English proficiency requirements, if applicable (applicant uploads unofficial copy directly). Original documents must be sent directly from issuing institution*.

*Note: Transcripts and English Proficiency documents must be sent directly from issuing institution(s) to:

Darlene Savoy, Administrative Assistant
School of Social Work, McMaster University
1280 Main Street West, KTH-319
Hamilton ON L8S 4M4
dsavoy@mcmaster.ca  

Timelines for Application

Applications will be reviewed starting January 20, 2017, and accepted until all positions are filled.

Offers of admission and financial support are normally sent out from early March to late May.

Application Form and Fee

Application forms must be completed online (portal is now open). Please note the search criteria for Academic Program is “Social Sciences MSW” and you must choose, "Full-time" option as our MSW: Critical Leadership program is not offered on a part-time basis. In the “Upload Documents” section, in addition to your CV & Statement of Interest, please also upload Samples of Writing, Unofficial Transcript(s) and TOEFL (if applicable).

A non-refundable $100 (CAN) application fee is applied to all applications. The fee can be paid on-line by MasterCard.  Please note that you must upload all documents BEFORE you pay the online application fee. If you choose to pay by cheque or money order please send it to the School of Graduate Studies address noted below. There is a handling fee of $15 (CAN) for cheques or money orders, making the total amount due $115 (CAN).

School of Graduate Studies
McMaster University
Gilmour Hall, Room 212
1280 Main Street West
Hamilton ON Canada L8S 4L8

Transcripts

Applicants must provide one official transcript(s) of university academic work completed to date, sent directly from the issuing institution to the School of Social Work (address above).

Statement of Interest

All applicants must provide a Statement of Interest not exceeding 5 typed double-spaced pages, expanding on your resumé, covering the following areas:

  1. Briefly describe a dilemma facing a community or organization to which you are connected. What are the key leadership challenges linked with this dilemma? 
  2. Discuss your work experience: reflect on opportunities you have had to participate in program planning, practice development, advocacy or administration - and particularly, how you have offered leadership in these contexts.  Your description should reflect the length, range and diversity of your experience.
  3. Indicate why you are interested in this particular program and how you expect it to help you in pursuing your career and personal development.

The supplementary statement is assessed based on comprehensiveness, clarity of presentation, capacity for critical thinking, and capacity for critical reflection based on experience. The declaration of your career goals and your ability to connect these with the specific focus of this program is important.

Letters of Reference

A complete application includes three confidential letters of recommendation - one academic, and two from work colleagues. Referees will be asked to describe work that you have been involved in that they have direct knowledge of, and to comment on a) your understanding and analysis of the organizational, community or activist contexts in which you work, and b) your potential for justice-oriented leadership in social services or communities. McMaster University uses the Electronic Referencing System. You must enter the email addresses of your referees as part of the on-line application form. The system will automatically send an e-Reference request on your behalf to the referees.

English Proficiency Requirements

If applicable, an official copy of your TOEFL score, or other evidence of competency in English is required. A minimum TOEFL score of 580 (or 237 on the computer-based TOEFL test) is needed.

Additional Information

Please complete our Pre-Application form so that we can verify your academic qualifications before you send a full application.

The School of Graduate Studies policy with regard to students with disabilities can be found in section 6.6 of the School of Graduate Studies Calendar. The full policy and further information may be obtained from the School of Graduate Studies or the Student Success Centre 905-525-9140 ext. 28652 or e-mail studentsuccess@mcmaster.ca.  For further information, consult McMaster University’s Policy for Academic Accommodation of Students with Disabilities.

Apply Now 

INTERNAL SCHOLARSHIPS AND BURSARIES

 

Ontario Student Assistance Program

Application forms and brochures can be obtained from the Student Financial Aid and Scholarships office at McMaster University. Application to OSAP can be made on line at http://www.osap.gov.on.ca



The Sidney L. Blum Bursary

Established in 1989 by friends and associates in memory of Sidney L. Blum.  To be awarded by the School of Graduate Studies, on the recommendation of the Student Financial Aid and Scholarships Office, to any graduate student in good standing in the Master’s program of the School of Social Work.

 

EXTERNAL AGENCY AWARDS
The agency guidelines and deadlines are subject to change at any time without prior notice. For complete and accurate information about external scholarship opportunities, applicants should always consult the external agency directly.

 

Naomi Grigg Fellowship

Soroptimist International of Toronto, a service club of business and professional women, is offering a Fellowship with a value of approx. $6,500.  This Fellowship is available to full time students enrolled in a post-graduate degree program (Masters, PhD) or in a program by which they acquire additional professional qualifications in an area related to gerontology.  Application forms are available from Margot Ryan 32 Pricklewood Crescent, Thornhill, Ontario, LeT 4T9, (905) 764-9961.   Deadline:  March 15.

Northern Bursary Program, Ministry of Community & Social Services

This provincial program offers various levels of financial assistance to post-secondary students pursuing careers in psychology, social work, speech pathology and Native ancestry, who are interested in working in designated areas of Northern Ontario.  Every student who receives a bursary must work in an area of the province designated by the Ministry of Community & Social Services, Northern Regional Office, 473 Queen St E, Ste 202, Sault Ste Marie, ON, P6A 1Z5.  Application deadline: August 31.

 

MAJOR EXTERNAL SCHOLARSHIPS

 

Ontario Graduate Scholarships (OGS)

 

Tri-Agency Canada Graduate Scholarship - Master's Programme

Applicants apply directly via Research Portal.

  • Deadline: December 1 (8:00pm)

 

School of Graduate Studies, Scholarships & Funding website:
http://graduate.mcmaster.ca/scholarships-and-funding

Darlene Savoy, Graduate Administrative Assistant
School of Social Work, McMaster University
1280 Main Street West, Kenneth Taylor Hall, Room 319
Hamilton ON L8S 4M4
dsavoy@mcmaster.ca  

 

Program Brochure
For more information:
School of Social Work
KTH 319
905-525-9140 ext. 24596
dsavoy@mcmaster.ca
Length:
1 year
Required Credential:
Bachelor of Social Work degree from an accredited social work program
Program Type:
Course Based, Practicum Based
Program Options:
Full-time
Typical Entry:
September
Current Deadline:
Applications will be reviewed starting January 20, 2017, and accepted until all positions are filled.

Ph.D.Doctor of Philosophy in Social Justice

Building on our unique MSW program that emphasizes the critical analysis of social policy, social work practice and leadership, the PhD program focuses on social work and social justice. It is designed to stimulate and support scholarship on the ways in which social policies and social work practices can contribute to redressing social inequalities and enhancing social justice.

PhD students will develop a critical appreciation of current and emerging social work scholarship related to social justice, and deepen their understanding with relevant perspectives from other areas of study. These objectives are achieved through a combination of course work, research seminars, and independent study.


The PhD program will prepare candidates for research, teaching and positions of leadership in social work and social welfare.

Course Requirements

Candidates for the PhD are required to complete a minimum of six post-MSW courses.

  • SW770, Social Work and Social Justice: Theoretical Tensions which will engage students with current theorizing on the relation between social work, social change and social equality.
  • SW 771, Research for Social Change which will examine scholarship on the embedding of power relations in the production of knowledge and in the conduct of research as a mechanism of social change.
  • SW 772, Qualitative Methods for Social Work or  students seeking quantitative or other methods courses can locate them in other programs on campus. *Pre-requisite Social Work 737 or equivalent.
  • SW 773, Doctoral Research Seminar which will examine key professional concerns among social work academics and researchers.
  • Two elective courses. Students will be encouraged to take at least one of their elective courses in another department in order to profit from the interdisciplinary opportunities at McMaster.

A Ph.D. candidate admitted without master’s level courses in epistemology (737) and in critical analysis of practice/ policy (700/731 or 701/703) will be expected to complete these courses in addition to the requirements of the doctoral program.

Candidates may be required to complete courses beyond the minimum requirements of the program in order that they achieve the breadth of perspective required by the program and are sufficiently prepared for their research.

 

Comprehensive Examination

The comprehensive examination is designed to evaluate the breadth of students’ knowledge of debates and developments in contemporary scholarship in social work and social justice. PhD candidates are required to situate their anticipated research topics in a wide and critical review of related theory and research, and to demonstrate their capacity for the integration of ideas and their skills in scholarly inquiry and writing. Candidates will consult with their supervisor in order to define the focus and parameters of the comprehensive exam and, by September of their second year, submit a five page proposal for the supervisor’s approval. With approval secured, candidates are expected to submit the completed examination (50-60 pages, plus references and appendices) by December 15th. Examination papers are evaluated by supervisors and by a second faculty member knowledgeable in the candidate’s area. Oral Examinations will normally be held in January of Year 2.

Dissertation

Students will be required to undertake original thesis research in areas of their substantive interest, engaging fully with its theoretical and methodological dimensions and demonstrating its contribution to academic and professional debate and action. By the beginning of their third year, students will submit a written thesis proposal to their supervisory committees, outlining the theoretical, substantive and methodological issues with which they plan to engage. PhD candidates will defend their thesis during a final oral examination. University regulations and procedures relating to supervisory committees and general degree requirements set the parameters for the program and are specified in the School of Graduate Studies calendar.

 


Students will bring to the PhD program critical perspectives on social work that are grounded in earlier studies and in experience in the field, as well as social research skills.

Eligibility

To be eligible for admission to the PhD program, applicants are normally required to have:

  • a completed MSW degree with an average of at least an A-. Applicants with master’s degrees in other subjects must be able to demonstrate substantial knowledge of the social service/ social welfare field and have experience of working in justice and equity-seeking services or organizations;
  • a completed graduate level course in social research methods; and
  • demonstrated interest and experience in critical approaches to policies, practices and knowledge-building in social work.

Applicants will be evaluated on the basis of their qualifications and the alignment of their interests with the research interests and availability of faculty.  Students considering admission to the PhD program are strongly encouraged to explore doctoral funding opportunities available from the Ontario Graduate Scholarship, the Social Science and Humanities Research Council, or the Canadian Institutes for Health Research.  Deadlines for these funding applications occur in the Fall prior to September admission. Please consult the School of Graduate Studies, Scholarships and Awards webpage for more details.

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Application Materials

Please upload scanned copies of all of your documents by deadline date of January 15th. In order for your application to be considered complete, it must include the following items:

  • Online Application Form and Fee
  • Statement of Interest (applicant uploads pdf directly)
  • Resumé (applicant uploads pdf directly)
  • Referee Reports (referees complete online report directly using e-referencing system)
  • *Transcripts (applicant uploads unofficial transcript directly). Original transcripts must be sent directly from issuing institution.
  • Copies of your two most recent papers, publications, presentations and/or agency reports (applicant uploads pdf directly)
  • *English proficiency requirements, if applicable (applicant uploads unofficial copy; original sent directly from issuing institution)

*Note: Official transcripts and English Proficiency documents must be sent directly from issuing institution(s) to:

Darlene Savoy, Administrative Assistant
School of Social Work, McMaster University
1280 Main Street West, Kenneth Taylor Hall, Room 319
Hamilton ON L8S 4M4
dsavoy@mcmaster.ca  



Timelines for Application

Deadline: January 15th

Review of applications will begin in January and admissions will be made to outstanding candidates as early in the new year as possible. If possible, please upload an unofficial copy of your transcript(s) and English Language Proficiency (if applicable) by the early deadline date of December 15th so that we may expedite assessment of your qualifications.

Offers of admission and financial assistance are normally sent out late January to end of April.

Application Form and Fee

Application forms must be completed online (portal is now open). Please note the Academic Program is “Social Sciences PhD” and Academic Plan is “Social Work PhD” (SOCWRKPHD). Please be sure to choose, "Full-time" option as our program is not offered on a part-time basis. In the “Upload Documents” section, in addition to your CV & Statement of Interest, please also upload Samples of Writing, Unofficial Transcript(s) and TOEFL (if applicable).

A non-refundable $100 (CAN) application fee is applied to all applications. The fee can be paid on-line by Visa or Mastercard.  If you choose to pay by cheque or money order please send it to the School of Graduate Studies address noted below. There is a handling fee of $15 (CAN), making the total amount due $115 (CAN).
School of Graduate Studies
McMaster University
Gilmour Hall, Room 212
1280 Main Street West
Hamilton ON Canada L8S 4L8

Transcripts

Applicants must provide two official transcripts of university academic work completed to date, sent directly from the issuing institution to the School of Social Work (address above).

Statement of Interest

Our PhD program takes as its central focus the fundamental tensions and challenges for social work practice and policy as they relate to social change and the enhancement of social justice. In articulating your interest in the program, please address the following (in a maximum of ten double-spaced pages):

  1. a) How do you understand the relationship between social work and social justice?
  2. b) In light of this understanding and the experience that you bring to the program, briefly describe your research interests and how you see your research unfolding. Using relevant literature, identify:
  • issues or questions that you want to explore.
  • their relationship to social justice concerns and the aims of the School’s program.
  • methodological approaches that you visualize using or exploring.
  • potential practice/policy implications of your research.

An MSW is normally required for admission. If your master’s degree was in a field other than social work, describe how your academic, community, activist and/or professional background prepares you for doctoral studies in our PhD program (Maximum length of 2 pages).

Letters of Reference

A complete application includes three referee report recommendations, at least two of which should be from academic referees, that assess your potential for doctoral studies and your suitability for our PhD program in social work and social justice. Referees will be asked to comment on your background (for example, your accomplishments, critical analysis skills, or engagement with social justice issues). McMaster University uses the Electronic Referencing System. You must enter the email addresses of your referees as part of the on-line application form. The system will automatically send an e-Reference request on your behalf to the referees.

English Proficiency Requirements

If applicable, an official copy of your TOEFL score, or other evidence of competency in English is required. A minimum TOEFL score of 580 (or 237 on the computer-based TOEFL test) is needed.

Additional Information

Please complete our Pre-Application form so that we can verify your academic qualifications before you send a full application.

The School of Graduate Studies policy with regard to students with disabilities can be found in section 6.6 of the School of Graduate Studies Calendar. The full policy and further information may be obtained from the School of Graduate Studies or the Student Success Centre 905-525-9140 ext. 28652 or e-mail studentsuccess@mcmaster.ca.  For further information, consult McMaster University’s Policy for Academic Accommodation of Students with Disabilities.

Apply Now 

At McMaster University, full-time PhD students are guaranteed minimum funding of $17,500 (full teaching assistantship + $8000 graduate scholarship) for their first four years of study.  Support for students may also come from faculty research funds in the form of research assistantships or opportunities to apply for sessional instructor positions in the Faculty.

 

School of Graduate Studies, Scholarships & Funding:

http://graduate.mcmaster.ca/scholarships-and-funding

 

INTERNAL SCHOLARSHIPS AND BURSARIES

 

Ontario Student Assistance Program

Application forms and brochures can be obtained from the Student Financial Aid and Scholarships office at McMaster University. Application to OSAP can be made on line at http://www.osap.gov.on.ca

 

SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK SCHOLARSHIP

 

The Penny Family Ontario Graduate Scholarship – in support of the study of social policy and social justice

Dr. Harry L. Penny, Founding Director of the School of Social Work, and his family have generously made a donation to McMaster University in order to establish an Ontario Graduate Scholarship.  The scholarship (value: $15,000) is to be awarded by the School of Graduate Studies, on the recommendation of the School of Social Work, to outstanding scholars who are likely to make distinguished contributions to the study of social policy and social justice.

 

EXTERNAL AGENCY AWARDS

 

Naomi Grigg Fellowship

Soroptimist International of Toronto, a service club of business and professional women, is offering a Fellowship with a value of approx. $6,500.  This Fellowship is available to full time students enrolled in a post-graduate degree program (Masters, PhD) or in a program by which they acquire additional professional qualifications in an area related to gerontology.  Application forms are available from Margot Ryan 32 Pricklewood Crescent, Thornhill, Ontario, LeT 4T9, (905) 764-9961.   Deadline:  March 15.

Northern Bursary Program, Ministry of Community & Social Services

This provincial program offers various levels of financial assistance to post-secondary students pursuing careers in psychology, social work, speech pathology and Native ancestry, who are interested in working in designated areas of Northern Ontario.  Every student who receives a bursary must work in an area of the province designated by the Ministry of Community & Social Services, Northern Regional Office, 473 Queen St E, Ste 202, Sault Ste Marie, ON, P6A 1Z5.  Application deadline: August 31.

 

MAJOR EXTERNAL SCHOLARSHIPS

Applicants submit application to School of Social Work for SSHRC (mid October) & Vanier, Stage1 (late August). CIHR applicants upload application to ResearchNet by mid September.

Selecting the Appropriate Federal Granting Agency (all students with health related research should carefully read this section)

SSHRC Joseph-Armand Bombardier Canada Graduate Scholarships (CGS) Program: Doctoral Scholarships and SSHRC Doctoral Fellowships Program


Canadian Institute of Health Research (CIHR) Doctoral Awards
Doctoral CIHR applications go directly to the agency; no university ranking.

Vanier Canada Graduate Scholarships

 

Ontario Graduate Scholarships (OGS)

 

Students are assigned a PhD Supervisor at the time of their acceptance into the program. The Supervisor will be a faculty member of the School of Social Work. An interim Supervisor may sometimes be appointed by the chairperson of the Graduate Studies Committee until an appropriate Supervisor is identified. In exceptional circumstances, a student may make a request to the Graduate Chair that they be assigned a different PhD Supervisor.


The PhD Supervisor acts as the chair of the student`s Supervisory Committee, and serves as the student`s primary research and academic advisor through the entire program.

Guide for the Prep of Master’s/Doctoral Theses
For more information:
School of Social Work
KTH 319
905-525-9140 ext. 24596
dsavoy@mcmaster.ca
Length:
6 years
Required Credential:
N/A
Program Type:
Thesis, Course Based
Program Options:
Full-time
Typical Entry:
September
Current Deadline:
January 15

G.Dip.Graduate Diploma in Critical Leadership in Social Services and Communities

The Graduate Diploma in Critical Leadership in Social Services and Communities is grounded in a recognition of the contemporary conditions of social service and community work, and in expansive and critical definitions of leadership. The diploma aims to enhance progressive leadership in the community and social service sectors. All students admitted to the program will have experience as leaders in community or social service settings. The Graduate Diploma enhances critical leadership practice through an academic exploration of issues that deliberately and consistently draws on students’ own leadership experiences

Students will deepen their understanding of how contemporary social, political and economic forces are (re)shaping social services and communities, and particularly how these forces shape leadership and leadership practices, including practices of research and evaluation. They will engage a range of theories of critical leadership and of social / organizational change and  demonstrate a capacity and identify, analyze and convey how leaders (can) create space for justice-oriented social service and community work.

The Graduate Diploma: Critical Leadership in Social Services and Communities curriculum is comprised of four courses. Students take one of two courses that consider specific contexts of social work practice:  institutional contexts (SW 740) or community contexts (SW721). Two required courses focus explicitly on aspects of leadership, organizational and social change; and one considers critical approaches to evidence and evaluation (a key feature of contemporary leadership).

Required Courses:

  • SOC WORK *741 / Changing Social Services, Changing Communities: Focus on Leadership
  • SOC WORK *742/  Organizational and Social Change: Theories, Practices and Possibilities for Leadership 
  • SOC WORK *743/ Critical Approaches to Evidence and Evaluation in Social Services and Communities

And one of:

Eligibility

To be eligible for admission to the Graduate Diploma in Critical Leadership in Social Services and Communities applicants are required to have:

  • Community or social service leadership experience
  • A completed M.S.W. or M.A. degree with a minimum average of A- on whole degree. In exceptional circumstances, applicants with a B.S.W. or B.A. and an A- average on senior level undergraduate courses who have extensive leadership experience may be eligible


Application Materials

In order for your application to be considered complete, it must include the following items:

  • Online Application Form and Fee
  • Statement of Interest (applicant uploads pdf directly)
  • Resumé (applicant uploads pdf directly)
  • Referee Reports (referees complete online report directly using e-referencing system)
  • Transcripts (applicant uploads unofficial transcript directly). Original transcripts must be sent directly from issuing institution*.
  • *English proficiency requirements, if applicable (applicant uploads unofficial copy). Original document must be sent directly from issuing institution*.

*Note: Transcripts and English Proficiency documents must be sent directly from issuing institution(s) to:

Darlene Savoy, Administrative Assistant
School of Social Work, McMaster University
1280 Main Street West, KTH-319
Hamilton ON L8S 4M4
dsavoy@mcmaster.ca  


Timelines for Application

Deadline to Apply: February 15th

Review of applications will continue until all positions have been filled.  Transcripts and evidence of English language proficiency sent directly from the issuing institution will be accepted up to two weeks past the deadline. If you have an unofficial copy of your English Language Proficiency (if applicable) and transcript(s) available prior to the deadline date, please send by email to Darlene Savoy, Graduate Administrative Assistant so that we may expedite assessment of your qualifications.

 

Offers of admission and financial assistance are normally sent out late February to mid June.

Application Form and Fee

Applications forms must be completed online (portal now open). Please note the search criteria for Academic Program is “Social Sciences Graduate Diploma” and be sure to choose, "Full-time" option as our program is not offered on a part-time basis. In the “Upload Documents” section, in addition to your CV & Statement of Interest, please also upload Unofficial Transcript(s) and TOEFL (if applicable). Please note that all documents must be uploaded before paying the application fee.

 

A non-refundable $100 (CAN) application fee is applied to all applications. The fee can be paid on-line by Mastercard.  If you choose to pay by cheque or money order please send it to the School of Graduate Studies address noted below. There is a handling fee of $15 (CAN) for cheque or money order, making the total amount due $115 (CAN).
School of Graduate Studies
McMaster University
Gilmour Hall, Room 212
1280 Main Street West
Hamilton ON Canada L8S 4L8

 

Transcripts

Applicants must provide one official transcript of university academic work completed to date, sent directly from the issuing institution to the School of Social Work (address above).

 

Statement of Interest

All applicants must provide a Statement of Interest not exceeding 5 typed double-spaced pages, expanding on your resumé, covering the following areas:

  1. Discuss your leadership experience. You might describe program planning, practice development, advocacy or administration.  Your description should reflect the length, range and diversity of your experience.
  2. Describe a leadership challenge or dilemma salient to a community or organization with which you are familiar. Outline your understanding of this dilemma and how you have worked to address it in your own practice.
  3. Indicate why you are interested in this particular diploma program and how you expect it to help you in pursuing your career and personal development.

The supplementary statement is assessed based on comprehensiveness, clarity of presentation, capacity for critical and innovative thinking, and capacity for critical reflection based on experience. The declaration of your career goals and your ability to connect these with the specific focus of this program is important.

An MSW or an MA is normally required for admission. If you do not have a master’s degree, describe your experience and facility with social science concepts and theories (maximum 2 pages).

 

Letters of Reference

A complete application includes three confidential letters of recommendation - one academic, and two from work colleagues. Referees will be asked to describe work you have been involved in that they have direct knowledge of, and comment on a) your understanding and analysis of the organizational, community or activist contexts in which you work, and b) your capacities and potential for justice-oriented leadership in social services or communities. McMaster University uses the Electronic Referencing System. You must enter the email addresses of your referees as part of the on-line application form. The system will automatically send an e-Reference request on your behalf to the referees.

 

English Proficiency Requirements

If applicable, an official copy of your TOEFL score, or other evidence of competency in English is required. A minimum TOEFL score of 580 (or 237 on the computer-based TOEFL test) is needed.

 

Additional Information

Please complete our Pre-Application form so that we can verify your academic qualifications before you send a full application.

The School of Graduate Studies policy with regard to students with disabilities can be found in section 6.6 of the School of Graduate Studies Calendar. The full policy and further information may be obtained from the School of Graduate Studies or the Student Success Centre 905-525-9140 ext. 28652 or e-mail studentsuccess@mcmaster.ca.  For further information, consult McMaster University’s Policy for Academic Accommodation of Students with Disabilities.

Apply Now 

Darlene Savoy

Graduate Administrative Assistant
School of Social Work

dsavoy@mcmaster.ca

905-525-9140, x24596

Program Brochure
For more information:
School of Social Work
KTH 319
905-525-9140 ext. 24596
dsavoy@mcmaster.ca
Length:
1 year
Required Credential:
N/A
Program Type:
Course Based
Program Options:
Full-time
Typical Entry:
September
Current Deadline:
Applications will be reviewed starting February 15, 2017, and accepted until all positions are filled.

MinorInterdisciplinary minor in Social Justice and Inclusive Communities

New in Fall 2017! The minor in Social Justice and Inclusive Communities provides students with the opportunity to understand structures and processes underlying social marginalization, and to explore the range of ways people and communities work to bring about social justice, equity, and inclusion.

Students will complete courses from the Faculties of Social Sciences and Humanities that address these themes and they will be able to select courses based on their own specific interests. 

Students should note that this minor is not accredited by the Canadian Association for Social Work Education and it is not a social work credential.  It is the student’s responsibility to check carefully for prerequisites, co-requisites and enrolment restrictions of all courses in this list. Students are encouraged to speak to their Faculty advisors about Faculty-specific rules about double-counting courses for the minor.

24 units total

3 units

From

  • SOCWORK 1AA3 - So You Think You Can Help? Introduction to Social Work I
  • SOCWORK 1BB3 -  Reimagining Help: Introduction to Social Work II

 

3 units

From

  • SOCWORK 1AA3 - So You Think You Can Help? Introduction to Social Work I
  • SOCWORK 1BB3 -  Reimagining Help: Introduction to Social Work II
  • ANTHROP 1AB3 – Introduction to Anthropology: Race, Religion and Conflict
  • INDIG ST 1A03 – Introduction to Indigenous Studies
  • INDIG ST 1AA3 – Introduction to Contemporary Indigenous Studies
  • LABRST 1C03 – Voices of Work, Resistance and Change
  • PEACEST 1A03 – Introduction to Peace Studies
  • SOCIOL 1C03 - Canadian Society: Social Problems, Social Policy, and the Law
  • WOMENST 1A03 – Women, Culture and Power

 

18 units

from

  • Course List (see below)

 

Course List:

  • ANTHROP 3F03 – Anthropology and the ‘Other’
  • ANTHROP 3Y03 – Aboriginal Community Health and Well-Being 
  • GEOG 4HD3 – Geographies of Disability
  • GEOG 4UF3 – Geography of Gender
  • HLTHAGE 2G03 – Mental Health
  • HLTHAGE 3D03 – Perspectives on Disability, Chronic Illness, and Aging
  • HLTHAGE 3E03 - Ethical Issues in Health and Aging
  • HLTHAGE 3R03 – Health Inequalities
  • HLTHAGE 3YY3 – Aboriginal Community Health and Well-Being
  • HISTORY 2EN3 – Emancipation and Nationalism in the Caribbean
  • HISTORY 3N03 – Poverty, Privilege and Protest in Canadian History
  • HISTORY 3XX3 – Human Rights in History
  • HISTORY 3WW3 – Women in Canada and the U.S. from 1920
  • INDIGST 2F03 – Residential Schools in Canada
  • INDIGST 3J03 – Government and Politics of Indigenous People
  • INDIGST 3K03 – Indigenous Human Rights
  • INDIGST 3N03 – Indigenous Women: Land, Rights, and Politics
  • LABRST 2W03 – Human Rights and Social Justice
  • PEACEST 2B03 – Human Rights and Social Justice
  • PEACEST 3HH3 – Justice and Social Welfare 
  • PHILOS 2G03 – Social and Political Issues
  • PHILOS 2YY3 – Introduction to Ethics
  • POLSCI 2C03 - Force and Fear, Crime and Punishment*
  • POLSCI 2XX3 Politics of the Developing World*
  • POLSCI 3F03 – Contemporary Social Movements Popular Coalitions
  • POLSCI 3K03 – Migration and Citizenship*
  • POLSCI 3PB3 - Politics from Below*
  • POLSCI 3V03 – Gender and Politics*
  • POLSCI 3Y03 – Democratization and Human Rights
  • POLSCI 4Y03 Domination and Decolonization*
  • RELIGST 2C03 – Bioethics
  • RELIGST 2RD3 – Religion and Diversity
  • SOCWORK 3B03 – Transnational Lives in a Globalizing World
  • SOCWORK 3O03 – Social Work and Sexualities
  • SOCWORK 3S03 – Social Work and Disability: Intersections & Exchanges
  • SOCWORK 3T03 - Poverty and Homelessness
  • SOCWORK 4C03 - Critical Perspectives on Race, Racialization, Racism and Colonialism in Canadian Society
  • SOCWORK 4I03 - Social Work & Indigenous Peoples
  • SOCWORK 4L03 - Social Work with an Aging Population
  • SOCWORK 4R03 - Feminist Approaches to Social Work and Social Justice
  • SOCWORK 4U03 - Immigration, Settlement and Social Work
  • SOCWORK 4Y03 - Critical Issues in Mental Health and Addiction: Social, Political and Historical Perspectives from Mad Studies and Critical Disability Studies for Social Work

  • SOCIOL 2EE3 – Introduction to Indigenous-Settler Relations in Canada
  • SOCIOL 2FF3 - The Sociology of “Race” and Ethnicity
  • SOCIOL 2HH3 - Sociology of Gender
  • SOCIOL 2JJ3 - Race, Class, Gender, and Sexuality
  • SOCIOL 2R03 – Perspectives on Social Inequality
  • SOCIOL 2RR3 – Case Studies of Social Inequality
  • SOCIOL 2MM3 – Political Sociology
  • SOCIOL 3NN3 - Popular Culture and Inequality
  • SOCIOL 3U03 – Sociology of Sexualities
  • SOCIOL 4DD3 – Social Movements 
  • WOMENST 2AA3 – Introduction to Feminist Thought
  • WOMENST 3BB3 – Women and Visual Culture

Undergraduate Scholarships, Bursaries and Awards

All undergraduate students accepted for admission to McMaster University are automatically considered for a McMaster University entrance award. Additional entrance awards, in-course scholarships, bursaries and other forms of financial assistance is available to you at various stages of their undergraduate careers.

Each scholarship, bursary, Government Aid or Work Study Program a has its own unique application process and requirements. More information on financial aid visit the Student Financial Aid & Scholarship (SFAS) Office.

Tammy Maikawa, Administrator and Academic Advisor
KTH-317

millet@mcmaster.ca

905-525-9140 ext.23793

Academic Advising

The Academic Advising office is run through the Office of the Associate Dean. The primary goal of the Advising Office is to provide all Social Sciences undergraduate students with the information and guidance they need to succeed in their academic careers.

Advisors can help you make the right academic decisions by explaining policies and regulations as well as presenting different options and supports available in your studies.

An academic advisor can assist you with:

  • Course requirements, dropping and adding courses
  • Program selection, application and changes
  • Studying abroad
  • Transfer credits
  • Petitions for missed term work, deferred examinations and special consideration
  • Appeals procedures
  • Referral to other campus services

Learn more about Academic Advising in the Social Sciences.

For more information:
School of Social Work
KTH 319
905-525-9140 ext. 23795
socwork@mcmaster.ca
Length:
N/A
Required Credential:
Enrolment in an Honours program.
Program Type:
Course based
Program Options:
Full-time, Part-time
Typical Entry:
January, September
Current Deadline:
April